Hi and welcome to the Alcona County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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Hi and welcome to the Alger County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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Hi and welcome to the Allegan County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Allegan County.

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Allegan was one of many counties named by Henry Schoolcraft.  According to the State of Michigan History site: "Its derivation is obscure. Most sources say it was a Henry Schoolcraft  creation with "al" for "the" and "egan" from "sa-gi-e-gan" (Chippewa for "lake"). Other meanings often given are "fine river" or "fair river."" The county is often called the "Cape Cod" of the Midwest and is abundant with lakes and borders on Lake Michigan. The Allegan County Fair is the largest in the Midwest.

Hi and welcome to the Arenac County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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Arenac was one of many counties named by Henry R. Schoolcraft. According to the State of Michigan History site: "it is a combination of the Latin "arena" (sandy) and the Native American "ac" (earth). The combined words mean "sandy place". "The first settlers arrived around 1819 from Canada which included English and Scots. The land was occupied by the Saginaw Chippewa. The reservations remained in the area of the mouth of the Rifle and Au Gres Rivers until they were ceded in 1837 to the government.

Hi and welcome to the Baraga County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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This county is named for Father Frederic Baraga, who came to this county from Austria in 1831 and made bishop of northern Michigan. The first visitors were French missionaries and traders who found shelter from Lake Superior on the shores of the Keweenau Bay in the 1600's. Father Baraga built a Catholic Mission at Assinins and devoted 10 years to educating the native Indians. L'Anse expanded when the railroad was built in 1871. The highest point in the Upper Peninsula is located at Mt. Curwood.

Hi and welcome to the Barry County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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This county was named after William Barry, Postmaster General under President Andrew Jackson. The first settlers arrived in 1831 and settled on the banks of the Thornapple River. Hastings has sites of historical interest with the courthouse and the Queen Anne style residence of the Striker house.

Barry County, MI  

Selected Data Extracted From Federal Census 1840-2000

year total pop total no. farms avg acres per farm employed in manuf. enrolled in school total no. foreign-born
1840 1,078 na na 0 0 na
1850 5,072 733 121.9 63 1,189 248
1860 13,849 1,462 111.4 82 na 1,252
1870 22,199 2,782 na 276 5,572 2,217
1880 25,317 3,616 90 313 na 2,330
1890 23,783 3,667 89 517 5,934 1,989
1900 22,514 3,570 95.8 638 na 1,636
1910 22,633 3,428 na na 4,304 1,316
1920 21,383 3,313 100.3 1,045 4,115 992
1930 20,928 2,656 na na 4,153 740
1940 22,613 3,111 na na 4,564 613
1950 26,183 2,390 na na 5,490 557
1960 31,738 na na na na na
1970 38,166 na na na na na
1980 45,781 na na na na na
1990 50,057 908** 186.0** 7,244 7,558* 447
2000 56,755 881** 187.0** na 8,171 na

"na" = data not available in listed sources
*1992 figures 
**1987, 1997 figures
Note:  1850,1990, 2000 school enrollment is for public school districts.     
[Barry County data extracted in Feb. 2002 by Lynn Kenney from sources listed below.]


ICPSR - United States Historical Census Data Browser   http://fisher.lib.virginia.edu/census/
US Census Bureau - Census 2000   http://www.census.gov/main/www/cen2000.html
USDA - Ag Census USA     http://www.nass.usda.gov/census/census97/profiles/mi/mi.htm
Michigan Economic Development Corp.   http://medc.michigan.org/miinfo/
Barry County Demographics   http://www.multimag.com/county/mi/barry/
Farmland Information Library   http://www.farmlandinfo.org/fic/home.html

Hi and welcome to the Bay County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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This is a county formed three years since, from portions of Saginaw and Midland; and embracing the whole of what was formerly known as Arenac county. It is bounded on the north by Iosco and Ogemaw counties, on the east by Saginaw bay and Tuscola county, on the south by Saginaw county, and on the west by Midland and Gladwin counties. The Saginaw river flows for a short distance through the southern part of the county, and the Coq-a-lane, Potatoe, White Feather, Sagenin, Rifle and Aux Grais rivers flow easterly through the northern and central portions, into Saginaw bay. The general surface of the county is level, heavily wooded, and in some parts swampy.

The soil is in most parts a deep rich loam, which produces abundantly all the crops known in central New York. There are but six organized townships in the county: Arenac, Bangor, Bay City, Hampton, Portsmouth and Williams. In Bangor, Bay City and Portsmouth, lying on the Saginaw river, there are extensive salt works now in active operation, and several others in process of erection, also large manufactories of lumber. Owing to the importance and value of the salt, lumber and fishing interests, in which a majority of the inhabitants are engaged, but little attention has been paid to agriculture, and for many years to come the county will be celebrated for its manufactures rather than its agricultural productions. Bay City, the county seat, has a fine harbor, and is a place of considerable importance. The present population of the county is about 4,000,--the census of 1860 shows 3,169. There were in 1860 twenty steam sawmills in operation, cutting 44,850,000 feet of lumber per season. The number of mills and amount of lumber sawed is now greatly increased. For a county but recently opened, the educational facilities are very good, and the improvement in this respect is very marked. The whole number of pupils attending school in 1860 was 563.

Hi and welcome to the Benzie County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The name "Benzie" is derived from the French Riviere Aux-Bec Scies or "river of sawbill ducks" (bec-scie). Americans altered the pronunciation of the river's name, which became known as the "Betsie River". A similar alteration in pronunciation produced "Benzie". The county was initially set off in 1863 and organized in 1869. At 321 square miles, Benzie County is the smallest of the 83 counties in Michigan.

Almira Township

  • Almira (West Almira) - Section 18, Spear Road, Lake Ann
  • Greenbriar (Green Briar/Almira Union) - Section 2, Reynolds Rd/Co. Rd. 667, Lake Ann
  • Lake Ann - Section 23, Reynolds Rd/Co. Rd. 667, Lake Ann

Benzonia Township

  • Benzonia Township - Section 35, Love Road, Benzonia

Blaine Township

  • Blaine - Section 24, Scenic Highway/M-22, Elberta

Colfax Township

  1. Holy Family (Nessen City Catholic) - Section 34, Lindy Rd., Nessen City Nessen City 
  2. Colfax Township (Nessen City Protestant) - Section 34, Nessen Rd. and Karlin/Co. Rd. 700, Nessen City
  3. Unknown - Section 26, SE coruner of SE quarter

Crystal Lake Township

  • Crystal Lake - Section 15, off Pilgrim Highway/M-22 N., Frankfort
  • Lutheran - Section 23, Frankfort Highway/M-115 E., Frankfort

Gilmore Township

  • Gilmore - Section 35, Grace Rd/Co. Rd. 606, Elberta

Homestead Township

  • Champion Hill - Section 8, N. Marshall/Co. Rd. 679 and Covey Rd., Honor
  • Homestead - Section 34, S. Pioneer Rd/Co. Rd. 677, Honor

Inland Township

  • Brundage - Section 17, off N. Carmen Rd., Bendon
  • Inland #1 (Old Inland/East Inland) - Section 13, Honor Hwy/US-31, Bendon Inland Township
  • Inland #2 (New Inland/West Inland) Section 13, Honor Hwy/US-31, Bendon New Inland 

Joyfield Township

  • Joyfield - Section 22, Benzie Hwy/US-31, Benzonia
  • Unknown - Section 26, Wallaker Rd., Benzonia

Platte Township

  • Platte - Section 8, Indian Hill Rd/Co. Rd. 679, Honor

Weldon Township

  • Thompsonville - Section 36, Front St., Thompsonville
  • Weldon - Section 9, S. Pioneer Rd/Co. Rd. 677, Homestead

Scrapbook Page 1

1. Mrs. A.A. Morrill
2. Mrs. Mary Rogers
3. Charlotte Wilson
4. Emmit Hagadorn
5. Wallace Dixon
6. Mrs. Cornelius Donovan
7. John McVicker
8. Mrs. Belle Hallack
9. Antoine L. Juneau
10. Mrs. E.E. Brimmer
11. A.R. Chattaway
12. Glenn Earl Lewis
13. Mrs. Ernest Carr
14. Mrs. Eleanor B. Yockey
15. Christ Millwood
16. Mrs. Benjamin H. Campbell
17. Mrs. Cora Nichols
18. Mrs. William Smeltzer
19. George A. Welkome
20. Mrs. William McVicker

Scrapbook Page 2

21. Pamelia D. Winters
22. Mrs. Elizabeth DeLaney
23. Miss. Dena May
24. Mrs. George F. Bell
25. Mrs. George F. Bell
26. Mrs. S. Erlandson
27. Joseph E. Hascher
28. Mrs. Maude Hascher
29. Mrs. Estella Lux
30. Oliver Dyer
31. Oliver Dyer
32. Clyde Smith
33. George Snell
34. George Snell
35. Mrs. Chas. Eggleston
36. Charles E. Smith
37. Mrs. Edward Lockhard
38. Mrs. Ada A. Fenner
39. Mrs. George Bell
40. Mrs. Louis Olson

Scrapbook Page 3

41. Lennis Collins
42. Lennis Collins
43. Mrs. Joseph Ruba
44. Oscar Brooks
45. Charles J. Humphrey
46. Charles James Humphrey
47. Humphrey
48. William McVicker
49. E.F. McVicker
50. S.C. Johnson
51. Walter F. Therman
52. John C. Stewart
53. Nurse Hazel Babcock
54. Jerry Pigeon
55. Mrs Gladys Smith
56. Mrs. Flora Stiles
57. Mrs. Gussie Gingrich
58. Mrs. Gussie Gingrich
59. Mrs. Fred Knoepfie
60. Ella Hyatt DeLaney

Scrapbook Page 4

61. William Herren
62. W.H. Herren
63. Will Herren
64. Will Herren
65. John Herren
66. Mrs. Wm. R. Menold
67. Ardath Boyd Putney
68. Mrs. Emma McNitt
69. Mrs. Frances Charley
70. William VanManen
71. Mrs. Mary Alice Nugent
72. Charles E. Smith
73. William Walkington
74. Mrs. Ellen Pelton
75. Mrs. Ellen Pelton
76. George Hart
77. Joseph W. Dilley
78. Mrs Rachel Tubbs
79. Frank L. Tubbs
80. S.B. Cummins

Scrapbook Page 5

81. Mrs. Victoria Chadsey
82. Mrs. Frank Bell
83. Ambrose Baker
84. Mrs. Baker
85. Manerva Baker
86. Mrs. Margaret Stewart
87. Orville Baxter
88. Mrs. Renwick
89. Mrs. Irene Whidden
90. Mrs. J.C. Stewart
91. Mrs. Maria Campbell
92. Mrs. Blanch Griffis
93. Mrs. Almyra Redner
94. Bessie McVicker
95. Phebe Lena Stewart
96. Daniel Kelly
97. Mrs. Belle Hallack
98. Mrs. L.N. Hodges
99. Mrs. George Trowbridge
100. Mrs. Mary E. Bonney
101. Walter A. Keebaugh
102. Robert Karczewski
103. Dorothy J. Doubledee
104. Mrs. Edgar Robinson
105. Frank Burlingame
106. Frank Hulbert
107. John S. Grice
108. William Ellis
109. Mrs. Estella Lux
110. Cyrus Hogarth

Scrapbook Page 6

111. Mrs. Minnie Otto
112. Fred Otto
113. Mrs. M.J. Kappler
114. Leo Hale
115. A. J. Tweedy
116. Timothy Wallaker
117. Charles Phelan
118. Mrs. James H. Merrill
119. Marie Hazel Shoun
120. Noma O'Connor

Scrapbook Page 7

121. Mrs. Wm. Menold
122. Mrs. Francis Watterson
123. Dewitt C. King
124. Mrs Pomeroy
125. Dr. H.D. Robinson
126. Mrs Hanna Nordbeck
127. Mrs Hannah Nordbeck
128. Alice G. Duncan
129. Dr. Edith E. Pelter
130. Marshall H. Potts
131. Mrs Jane V. Post
132. Mrs. Alexander Freeman
133. Mrs. Bisbee
134. Mrs. Agnes Dauser
135. Fred M. Gleason
136. George Flasher
137. Elmer Blair Wareham
138. J. Herbert Read
139. Swan Erlandson
140. Mrs. J.E. Merrill
141. Wilber L. Tolbert
142. Mrs. Wilber L. Tolbert
143. Lizzie Taylor
144. August Jaeger, Sr.
145. Charles A. Gray
146. Mrs. Della Kinney
147. Louisa Humphrey Erdly
148. Thomas Thorndyke
149. Mrs. O.M. Northrup
150. A.A. Morrill

Scrapbook Page 8

151. Mrs. Wm. Bell
152. Mrs Harry T. Baldwin
153. Delos Helmer
154. Austin D. Bates
155. G.W. Bixby
156. Mrs. D.A. Cornell
157. Frank S. Haswell
158. George Annis
159. Mrs Thomas Thorndyke
160. Max Hoadley
161. Mrs. Oscar Brooks
162. Mrs. Chas Stewart
163. Dr. FW Heysett
164. Lyle Brooks
165. Gilford B. Johnson
166. Mrs. Eliza Clark
167. Calvin Willard McVicker
168. Clyde H. DeLaney
169. Elmer LeRoy Otto
170. Peter Johnson
171. Mrs. D.A. Smith
172. Mrs Lucy Smith
173. Mrs. Del Smith
174. Mrs. Mrs. Lucy Campbell Smith
175. Delvan Smith
176. Beverly Jean Smith
177. Mrs. Esther Harwood
178. Mrs Charles V. Johnson
179. Isaac M Post
180. Mrs. Martha Rice

Scrapbook Page 9

181. Mrs. Milton Renwick
182. John H. Stewart
183. Mrs. Beckwith
184. Oren H. Burlingame
185. Clark B. Hand
186. DeWitt King
187. M.T. Crimmins
188. Michael T. Crimmins
189. William F. Keebaugh
190. Eugene Mix
191. Mrs. Marvel Schuster
192. Mrs. Marvel Liddy Schuster
193. Charles Bronson
194. Mrs. Mary Smith Barlow
195. Mrs. Marie Strader
196. Mrs. Otillia Barnhart
197. Eva Palmer
198. In Memory of Hannah Nordbeck
199. James May
200. Mrs Caroline Host
201. Mrs. Pearl Eliza Crain
202. Mrs. Francis Stiles
203. Mrs. Geo. Morrill
204. George A. Morrill
205. Mrs. Clara Langford
206. Charles Jones
207. F.C. Lee
208. Mrs. Louis K. Hukill
209. Mrs. Fanny Salisbury
210. Rollett Eddy

Scrapbook Page 10

211. W.J. Charley
212. A.J. Chappell
213. Fred Berthold
214. Richard G. Peters
215. Mrs. Martha M. McVicker
216. Mrs. Hannah M. Potts
217. Rev. J.H. Rayle
218. Charles E. Smith
219. Mrs Augusta Hart
220. Julius Hale
221. George Campbell
222. James Freeman
223. Ambrose marks
224. Charles Kobe
225. Child of Newman Meacham
226. Mrs. Harry N. Fribley
227. Miss Alma Lovejoy
228. Mrs. John C. Curtis
229. Jasper Newton Clark
230. Eliza McVicker Helmer
231. Joel S. Haines
232. Mrs. James B. Rozell
233. Alex Roe
234. Mrs. Madors Janes
235. Douglas Rogers
236. Alvin L. Gilbert
237. Dr. S.H. Cornell
238. Mrs. C.L. Bennett
239. Mrs. Hattie D. Jones.
240. Wilber L. Nichols

Scrapbook Page 11

241. Mrs. Mary McCarthy
242. Mrs Mary Kraft
243. Mrs. Everett Silby
244. Henry Allen Cutler
245. Sandra Jane Menold
246. Mrs. Josephine Host
247. Mrs. Ella LeVant
248. Florence DeLaney
249. Mrs. Dan Keith
250. Frank A. Host
251. Nelson Drake
252. James Henry Merrill
253. Charles Hunt
254. Lester F. Trimble
255. Jacob C. Gilson
256. Mrs. Menne Hagstrom
257. Gerald Langford & Fritz Ruth
258. Miner D. King
259. Mrs. Etta Stever
260. Clarence C. Hoot
261. Margaret Boak
262. Mrs. Floyd Robertson

Scrapbook Page 12

Marriages

1. Stevens - Stewart
2. McVicker - Suffels
3. McVicker - Suffels
4. Smith - Cameron
5. Fox - Spencer
6. Stewart - Johnson
7. Stewart - Johnson
8. Stewart - Curtis
9. Smith - Appelquist
10. Bell - Moote
11. Griffith - Smith

Anniversaries
1. Mr. and Mrs. Frank Morehouse
2. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hagadorn
3. Mr. and Mrs. Paul Oman
4. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Myatt
5. Dr. and Mrs. Stever
6. Dr. and Mrs. Stever
7. Mr. and Mrs. Knoeppel
8. Mr. and Mrs Wm. Joyce

Scrapbook Page 13

Article about Whaley family

Contributed by Vicki Wilson

Hi and welcome to the Branch County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The queries linked below are archived - there is no guarantee that the e-mail address is valid.

  • Adams Cemetery
  • Amish Cemetery
  • Ammerman Cemetery
  • Batavia Cemetery
  • Boot Hill Cemetery
  • Bronson Cemetery
  • Brown Family Cemetery
  • Butler Cemetery
  • California Corners Cemetery
  • Card Cemetery
  • Curtis Cemetery
  • Dutch Settlement Cemetery
  • East Gilead Cemetery
  • Evergreen Cemetery
  • Fisher Cemetery
  • Gilead Cemetery
  • Haight Cemetery
  • Hill Cemetery
  • Hooping Corner Cemetery
  • Hultz Family Cemetery
  • Hurley Cemetery
  • Knauss Cemetery
  • Lake Cemetery
  • Lake View Cemetery
  • Lawrence Cemetery
  • Lester Cemetery
  • Lockwood Cemetery
  • Mason Cemetery
  • Matteson Cemetery
  • Morse Street Cemetery
  • Mount Hope Cemetery
  • Munday Cemetery
  • North Sherwood Cemetery
  • Oak Grove Cemetery
  • Ovid Cemetery
  • Pleasant Hill Cemetery
  • Saint Marys Cemetery
  • Sherwood Cemetery
  • Shooks Prairie Cemetery
  • Snow Prairie Cemetery
  • Sorter Cemetery
  • Springbrook Cemetery
  • Trayer Cemetery
  • West Prairie Cemetery
  • Whig Center Cemetery
  • Wilson Cemetery
  • York Cemetery

Hi and welcome to the Calhoun County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Calhoun County.

This county was named for John Caldwell Calhoun (1782-1850) Vice President of the U.S.The first settler was Sidney Ketchu, who settled in the Kalamazoo Valley in 1830. Many of the residents activel aided fugitives slaves. In 1866 Dr. John Kellogg created a granola cereal. By 1900, Battle Creek had become the "Cereal Capital of the World" with the Post and Kellogg Companies. Marshall has a famous historical district.

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Hi and welcome to the Cass County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Cass County.

The county is named after Lewis Cass (1782-1866 ) who was the Territorial Governor of Michigan from 1813-31. In the 1820's white settlers occupied the Potawatomis territory. US-12 was once an Indian trail that crossed the state from Detroit in the east to Chicago in the west. the early settlers came from Berrien which included New Englanders, Southerners, and a large Black and Indian population. Although most Potawatomis were forced off their land, some Native Americans resisted, and in 1837 were able to purchase 1,000 acres of land in Silver Creek Township. Many descendants can still be found living there today. The Black population was aided by the Quakers who had left the South due to slavery. They helped slaves escape through the underground railroad. About 2 miles east of Cassopolis is The William Jones House, a station for the underground railroad.

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Hi and welcome to the Charlevoix County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Charlevoix County.

The county was originally called Keskauko, but in 1843 was renamed Charlevoix for Pierre de Charlevoix (1682-1761), a Jesuit missionary who had traveled the Great Lakes seeking passage to the Pacific. In 1847 James Strang, an elder o f the Mormon Church, founded a religious colony on Beaver Island. After his assassination in 1856 the colony dissolved. The county experienced slow growth until the 1870’s with Grand Rapids and Indiana Railroad. Lumbering was a major attraction that eventually declined and was replaced by tourism as an important industry. Ernest Hemingway spend many summers in the county as a child which provided material for his short stories. The county has some of the finest skiing in the state. Boyne City hosts a national mushroom picking championship in May. Charlevoix has many attractions with fine beaches on Lake Michigan and Lake Charlevoix and hosts an apple festival in the fall.

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Hi and welcome to the Cheboygan County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Cheboygan County.

Cheboygan is a Native American word first applied to the Cheboygan River. Permanent settlers were not in Cheboygan until 1844. The first sawmill was built in the 1870's. Cheboygan's population expanded until the late 1890's due mostly to the lumbering, shipping, and fishing industries. The county seat, Cheboygan, has a coast guard base and hosts the Northern Michigan Fair.

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Hi and welcome to the Chippewa County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The following Queries are presented for historic purposes, there is no guarantee that the email address is still valid.

Hi and welcome to the Clare County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The county was first named Kaykee after a Chippewa chief in 1840. An Irish surveyor in 1843 change the name in honor of the county of his origin. Clare county was first settled by William Crawford, a Civil War veteran, in Grant Township. It was here a sawmill was built and a village soon grew, and later became known as Dover. Lumbering was a major factor in the settling of Clare County. When the railroad arrived in 1871 the transportation system improved and more towns grew.

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Hi and welcome to the Clinton County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Clinton County.

A huge thanks to Bonnie McVicar-Briggs for originally developing this county.

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Have you transcribed a cemetery in Clinton County?  Would you be willing to share it here to help other researchers?  If so, please contact us.

The DeWitt District Library has many of the County Cemeteries on-line.  Check out their website.

TownshipSection#Cemetery Name
Bath Section 20 Pleasant Hill
Section 20 Rose
Bengal Section 2 Frink
Section 27 Bray
Section 30 Oakridge
Section 35 Georgia
Bingham Section 6 Gardner
Section 6 Mt. Rest, St Johns
Section 23 South Bingham
Dallas Section 9 Most Holy Trinity
Section 36 St. Paul Lutheran
Dewitt Section 5 Dewitt located in Dewitt
Section 20 Hurd Located on Dewitt Rd, west side, north of Stoll Rd.
Section 23 Gunnisonville located at the corner of Wood St. and Clark Rd. Next to the church.
Duplain Section 10 Riverside
Section 11 Elsie Village
Section 29 Duplain
Eagle Section 9 North Eagle
Section 23 Niles
Essex Section 5 Maple Rapids Village
Section 9 Sowle
Section 19 Jones or Beach
Section 23 Lowe
Section 36 Prairie
Greenbush Section 8 Union Home
Section 11 Eureka
Section 23 Richmond
Section 28 French
Section 32 Schoolhouse
Lebanon Section 30 East Plains
Olive Section 5 Merrihew Located on north side of Price Rd, east of DeWitt Rd.
Section 20 Alward Lake Located on the southeast corner of DeWitt and Alward Rds.
Section 35 Wilsey Located on Bond Rd approximately one half mile north of Round Lake Rd.
Ovid Section 13 Maple Grove - Ovid
Section 29 South Ovid
Riley Section 7 Boughton Located on the Dexter Trail, south of Price Rd directly across from the end of Church Road.
Section 8 St. Peter Lutheran
Section 35 South Riley Township Cemetery Located on east side of Lowell Road, north of Cutler Road.
Victor Section 9 Stilson
Section 13 Blood
Section 21 Reed
Watertown Section 17 Wacousta
Westphalia Section 8 St. Mary's

Hi and welcome to the Crawford County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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Hi and welcome to the Delta County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Delta County.

Delta County's name came from the Greek "delta," it refers to the triangular shape of the original county which included segments of Menominee, Dickinson, Iron and Marquette counties. French missionaries were first to arrive around 1650's in Little Bay de Noc. Lumber and fishing were the primary industries until 1864, when the railroad from Negaunee to Escanaba was completed. This allowed the mining industry to flourish we easy access to transportation.

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Hi and welcome to the Dickinson County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Dickinson County.

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Hi and welcome to the Eaton County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Eaton County.

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Hi and welcome to the Emmet County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Emmet County.

Originally named Tonedagana after an Ottawa chief, the name was changed for the Irish patriot Robert Emmet (1778-1803), who was hung as a traitor to the British government at the age of 23. Two old villages containing artifacts that may date back 4, 000 years are on the list of National Historic sites. the first settlers were fisherman who arrived around 1820. The arrival of the Grand Rapids and Indiana at Petoskey spurred growth in 1873. There was a short lumber boom that lasted until 1890's but that has been replaced by tourism.

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Hi and welcome to the Genesee County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Genesee County.

 

Genesee County was founded in 1837. The county seat is Flint. Surrounding communities are Argentine, Atlas, Burton, Clio, Davison, Fenton, Flushing, Gaines, Genesee, Grand Blanc, Goodrich, Linden, Montrose, Mt. Morris, Otisville, Rankin, and Swartz Creek.

 

 

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Cemeteries

Cemetery Address Phone Township
Covenant Cemetary Svc 11081 Clio Rd, Clio, MI 48420-1445 810-687-5858  
Crestwood Memorial Cemetery 2020 E Hill Rd, Grand Blanc, MI, 48439-5108 810-694-4101  
Davison Cemetery 10080 E Potter Rd, Davison, MI, 48423-8110 810-653-8300  
Eastwood Memorial Gardens 3136 N. State St., Davison, MI 48423 810-653-2196  
Evergreen Cemetery formerly Whigville Cemetery 3415 E Hill Rd, Grand Blanc, MI, 48439-8106 810-694-6541  
Fenton Corp 10260 White Lake Rd, Fenton, MI, 48430-8724 810-629-2847  
Flint Memorial Park Cemetery 9506 N Dort Hwy, Mount Morris, MI, 48458-1234 810-686-3660  
Glenwood Cemetery 2500 W Court St, Flint, MI, 48503-3154 810-239-3222  
Grace Lawn Community Cemetary 5710 N Saginaw St, Flint, MI, 48505-2976 810-789-5500  
Lovedale Memorial Cemetery 5175 E Bristol Rd, Burton, MI, 48519-1503 810-742-5580  
Machpellah Cemetery Assn 4615 Branch Rd, Flint, MI, 48506 810-736-7020  
Meadowview Memorial Gardens 3136 N State Rd, Davison, MI, 48423-1149 810-653-2196  
New Calvary Catholic Cemetery, 4142 Flushing Rd, Flint, MI, 48504-3960, 810-732-2620  
Richfield Union Cemetery      
Riverrest Cemetery 4413 Flushing Rd, Flint, MI, 48504-3975 810-732-0260  
Sunset Hills Cemetery 4413 Flushing Rd, Flint, MI, 48504-3975 810-732-0260  
Tanner Cemetery Belsay Rd, Flint, MI, 48506 810-736-8601  
Tyrone Memory Gardens 10260 White Lake Rd, Fenton, MI, 48430-8724 810-750-0804  
Woodlawn Memorial Cemetery 2020 E Hill Rd, Grand Blanc, MI, 48439-5108 810-767-2621  

Hi and welcome to the Gladwin County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Gladwin County.

 

 

 

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  • Arbutus Cemetery
  • Beaverton City Cemetery
  • Billings Township Cemetery (Free Will Baptist)
  • Bourret Township Cemetery
  • Butman Cemetery
  • Catholic Cemetery (Gladwin)
  • Dale Cemetery
  • Grout Township Cemetery
  • Highland Cemetery - Gladwin
  • Hill Cemetery
  • Hope Lutheran Cemetery - near Rhodes
  • McClure Cemetery
  • New Rhodes Cemetery - Rhodes
  • Rhodes Cemetery - Rhodes
  • Ridge Cemetery
  • Secord Lutheran Cemetery
  • Skeel Cemetery

Hi and welcome to the Gogebic County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Gogebic County.

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Hi and welcome to the Grand Traverse County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Grand Traverse County.

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Hi and welcome to the Gratiot County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Gratiot County.

Gratiot County encompasses the geographical center of Michigan's Lower Peninsula and was named for Captain Charles Gratiot (1788-1855), who supervised the building of Fort Gratiot at the present site of Port Huron. After much controversy the county seat was established at Ithaca in 1856.

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Hi and welcome to the Hillsdale County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Hillsdale County.

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Hi and welcome to the Ingham County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Ingham County.

A huge thanks to Sondra Higbee who created and developed the original Ingham County website.  Unless otherwise noted all content contributed by Sondra Higbee.

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mason postcard

Ash Street looking West, MASON, Mich.
Post Card mailed from Mason, Mich. on Aug. 1, 1910

The city of Mason, the seat of justice for the county of Ingham, occupies a position near the centre thereof, in the township of Vevay, out of which it takes four sections, ---- viz., 4, 5, 8, and 9. The small stream known as Sycamore Creek flows through the city from south to north, and in days gone by the limited power which it furnished was utilized, but for the better health of the citizens the dam was removed and the mill-pond drained. Bordering the creek on the east is a high gravel ridge, or moraine, which is mentioned elsewhere. From it is obtained a plentiful supply of gravel, for use upon the streets of the city. Many excellent improvements are noted within the limits of this city, and its business buildings rank with those in much larger places in point of architecture and size. Enterprise is nearly everywhere manifest, and the aim of the citizens appears to be to place their home in the front rank among the lesser cities of Michigan. Constant improvements are beingm made, which require liberal outlays of the wealth which in forty years has been accumulated.

Alaiedon Township
Leek Cemetery - Active
Phillips Cemetery (Strickland) - Inactive
Dubois Cemetery (Foote) - Inactive

Aurelius Township
Fowler Cemetery - Active
Greenwood Cemetery - Active
North Aurelius (Wright) - Active
Plains Cemetery - Active

Bunker Hill Township
Felt Plains Cemetery - Active
Bunker Hill Center Cemetery - Active
Fitchburg Cemetery - Active
Holt Cemetery - Active
S. S. Cornelius & Cyprian Cemetery - Active

Delhi Township
Maple Ridge Cemetery - Active
Pioneer Cemetery - Inactive
Markham Cemetery - Active
Unknown Cemetery - Abandoned

Ingham Township
Fairview Cemetery - Active
Howard Cemetery - Active

Lansing Township
St. Joseph Cemetery - Active

Leroy Township
Alchin Farm Cemetery - Active
Webberville Cemetery - Inactive

Leslie Township
Woodlawn Cemetery - Active

Locke Township
Bell Oak Cemetery - Active
Rowley Cemetery - Active
Brick Cemetery - Active
Mt. Calvary Cemetery - Active

Meridian Township
Glendale Cemetery - Active
East Lawn Cemetery - Active
Brick Cemetery (Wilgus) - Active
Mt. Calvary Cemetery - Active

Onondaga Township
Onondaga Cemetery - Active
Lane Cemetery - Inactive

Stockbridge Township
Stockbridge Cemetery - Active
North Stockbridge Cemetery - Active
Derby Cemetery - Inactive

Vevay Township
East Cemetery - Active
Rolfe Cemetery - Inactive
Maple Grove Cemetery - Active
Hawley Cemetery - Active

Wheatfield Township
Dennis Cemetery - Active
Spaulding Cemetery - Active
Cabot Cemetery (Meech) - Inactive

White Oak Township
White Oak Cemetery (Mt. Pleasant) - Inactive

Williamston Township
Summit Ridge Cemetery - Active
Foote Cemetery - Active
Stoughton Cemetery - Inactive
Forrester Cemetery - Inactive

City of Lansing
Evergreen Cemetery - Active
Mt. Hope Cemetery - Active
North Cemetery - Active
Chapel Hill Memory Gardens - Active

Hi and welcome to the Iona County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Iona County.

A huge thanks to Beth Wills who developed the original website for Ionia County.  Unless specified all content copyright Beth Wills.

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Hi and welcome to the Iosco County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Iosco County.

This was a favorite name used by Henry Schoolcraft for Native American boys and men in his writings. He interpreted the word to mean "water of light." Iosco was first inhabited by Chippewa Indians. Tawas Bay which is the largest harbor on the Great Lakes was named after Chief O-Ta-Was, known for fishing the waters of Lake Huron. The first white men in the area in the 1830’s were French fur traders and trappers who settled up trading posts along the banks of the Au Sable River. The lumber industry of of the 1880’s brought civilization to the area.

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Hi and welcome to the Iron County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Iron County.

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Hi and welcome to the Isabella County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Isabella County.

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Hi and welcome to the Jackson County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Jackson County.

Jackson County, named for President Andrew Jackson (1829-1837) , seventh president of the US, is located in the central/southern portion of Michigan’s Lower Peninsula. Jackson was first settled in 1929, when Horace Blackman from Tioga County, NY, first filed a claim. The Michigan Central Railroad was completed through Jackson in 1841. Jackson is the birthplace of The Republican Party that was founded on July 14, 1854.

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Hi and welcome to the Kalkaska County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Kalkaska County.

Kalkaska was first settled in 1855 by William Copeland. By 1872 the railroads were being built further north Mr. Abbot and Mr. Thompson speculated that the railroad would come through what is now the town of Kalkaska and built a mill in early 1873. They were right and Kalkaska became the county seat. The mainstays of revenue were lumbering and farming. When they declined in the early 1900's so did the population. In the 1970's oil and natural gas were discovered.

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Hi and welcome to the Lake County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Lake County.

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Hi and welcome to the Leelanau County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Leelanau County.

A huge thanks to Vicki Wilson who created our first Leelanau County website and for some of the content here.

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Hi and welcome to the Luce County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Luce County.

The county was named for Cyrus Gray Luce, Governor of Michigan from 1887 to 1890. Before 1870 the county was sparsely settled. When the railroad opened in 1881 between St. Ignace and Marquette, John Newberry founded the Vulcan Furnace Company beside the rail line. The hardwood forests were used for charcoal for iron smelting. A state hospital was opened in 1903 and today that hospital is one of the largest employers in the county. The county is still mostly undeveloped. The Tahquamenon Falls are the second largest waterfalls east of the Mississippi.

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Hi and welcome to the Manistee County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Manistee County.

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Hi and welcome to the Marquette County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Marquette County.

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Marquette County Cemeteries

MARQUETTE:
---Old Catholic--Section 26, SW corner of Pioneer Road and CR 553, Marquette.
---Park--Section 15, corner of Ridge and 77th Streets, Marquette.
---Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery, Section 110, 1415 Wright St., Marquette.

CHAMPION TOWNSHIP:
---Champion--Section 32, Cemetery Street, Champion.
---***Sacred Heart Catholic--Section 31, CCounty Road, Champion.

CHOCOLAY TOWNSHIP:
---*Green Garden (St.Paul's Lutheran)--Secction 35, US-41, Marquette.

ELY TOWNSHIP:
---****Clarksburg--Section 7, US-41 and M--28, Clarksburg.

FORSYTH TOWNSHIP:
---Bakkala--Section 2, off of M-35, Princeeton.
---Gwinn--Section 21, Boulder Street, Gwinnn.

HUMBOLDT TOWNSHIP:
---Humboldt Township--Section 9, Halfway RRoad, Champion.

ISHPEMING TOWNSHIP:

---Ishpeming--Sections 3 & 34, Deer Lake/CCR 573, Ishpeming.
---Ishpeming First City--Section 3, in Ishhpeming. Site.
---**Saint John's Catholic--Section 3, in Ispeming. Site.

MICHIGAMME TOWNSHIP:
---Lakeview (Michigamme)--Section 30, Mesnnard St/CR 611, Michigamme.

NEGAUNEE TOWNSHIP:
---Indian--Section 28. Site.
---Negaunee--Sections 33 & 34, Sandy Drivee & Forge Road, Negaunee.
---Negaunee First (Catholic)--Section 6, iin Negaunee. Site.
---Negaunee Second--Sections 5 & 32, in Neegaunee. Site.
---Northland Chapel Gardens--Section 24, CCounty Road 502, Negaunee.

POWELL TOWNSHIP:
---Big Bay--Section 16, Deutsch Avenue, Biig Bay.
---Unknown--Section 29, Big Bay. On privatte property.
---Unknown--Section 8, Big Bay. Site. On pprivate property.

REPUBLIC TOWNSHIP:
---*****Republic--Section 5, Kloman Avenuee, Republic. (See Note Below)

RICHMOND TOWNSHIP:
---**Kultilahti (Suomi Location)--Section 10, 2 miles off M-35 about 5 miles from Palmer. On private property.

SKANDIA TOWNSHIP:
---*Emmanuel Lutheran Church--Section 29, US-41, Skandia.
---*Haglund (Skandia)--Section 18, Ingallss Road, Skandia.
---*United Methodist Church--Section 18, TTown Line Road, Skandia.

TURIN TOWNSHIP:
---***Hillview--Section 30, County jRoad 4444, McFarland.

WELLS TOWNSHIP:
---***Forest Home--Section 16, off of Counnty Road 426.
---***Riverview--Section 6, County Road 4226.

WEST BRANCH TOWNSHIP:
---***West Branch--Section 26, County Roadd 460, Skandia.

KEY:
*=Cemetery is Read.
**=Read is in Progress.
***=Read & Published.
****=Catherine Grady and her husband read this cemetery.

Hi and welcome to the Mason County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Mason County.

This county was named for Stevens T. Mason (1811-1843), first governor of the State of Michigan (1835-1840). In 1675, Pere Jacques Marquette was ill so his party landed at the mouth of the river now named for him. Around 1850, the lumber men were attracted to area's rich forest. James Ludington established saw mill at the mouth of the Pere Marquette River and named the town after himself. Lumbering peaked in 1891 and salt deposits were discovered. A car ferry system was established by the Pere Marquette Railroad in 1897.

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Hi and welcome to the Mecosta County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Mecosta County.

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Hi and welcome to the Menominee County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Menominee County.

The county was named for the Menominee tribe who lived in the vicinity. The word means "rice men" or "rice gatherers." By 1790 a French Canadian named Louis Chappieau opened a thriving fur trading operation. The Menominee river flowed through vast pine forests and the first sawmill was opened in 1832. By 1890 the area ranked second in the nation as a principal lumbering region. Agriculture began to replace lumbering by 1917.

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Hi and welcome to the Midland County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Midland County.

Midland County is located at the geographical center of Michigan’s Lower Peninsula The land was ceded to the US Government by Pottawatomi, Chippewa and Ottawa Indians who inhabited the area in 1819. There were few white settler's in the 1820 due to Indian hostilities for losing most of their lands. French fur traders came 1831 and made their home around "The Forks," an area where the Pine and Chippewa Rivers flow into the Tittabawassee, or "shining" river, as the Indians referred to it. As the lumbering boom hit the region, this area developed until 1880 when it peaked. By 1897, Herbert Henry Dow, who sunk the first salt well in the state in Midland county, founded the Dow Chemical Company.

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Hi and welcome to the Missaukee County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Missaukee County.

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Hi and welcome to the Monroe County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Monroe County.

Monroe County was established in 1817. The county was named for James Monroe (1758-1831), 5th president of the United States (1817-1825). He visited Detroit on August 13, 1817, and stayed five days. The county was named in anticipation of his visit.

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Hi and welcome to the Montcalm County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Montcalm County.

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Hi and welcome to the Muskegon County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Muskegon County.

Muskegon County was established in 1869. The name Muskegon is derived from the Native American word meaning "river with marshes".

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Hi and welcome to the Newaygo County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Newaygo County.

Newaygo County was set off in 1840, organized in 1851 and was named after Newaygo, a Chippewa Chief that was one of the signers of the Treaty of Saginaw in 1812. The county seat is White Cloud.

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Oakland County Cemetery Listing


Need help locating a cemetery? There is a book available through the Library of Michigan that can help you. It is a book of county maps that includes the location of each cemetery in the county. This book is probably available in various other libraries but can also be purchased from the Library of Michigan.

Name of Cemetery Location Phone Comments
Aaron Webster Cemetery South Squirrel Road Auburn Hills 48326 248-858-0738 Established: 1822
Acacia Park Cemetery 31300 Southfield Road Birmingham 48009 248-646-4228 Partial Transcription
All Saints Cemetery 4401 Nelsey Road Waterford Township 48329 810-623-9633 -
Anderson Ridge Cemetery City of Troy - -
Andersonville Cemetery 6561 Bridge Lake Road Clarkston, 48346 - -
Auburn Heights Cemetery Auburn Heights - Book Available at: Oakland Co Research Library
Avon Township Cemetery 1200 N Telegraph Road Pontiac 48341 - Book Available at: Oakland Co Research Library
Bald Eagle Lake Cemetery Brandon Township South of Ortonville Burials recorded at MI State Library
Beach Road Cemetery Beach Road Troy 48084 - Esb 1854 Inactive
Beebe Cemetery Rose Center & Fist Lake Roads Holly Township -
Beekman Cemetery Bet 12 & 13 Mile Southfield Abandoned
Beth Abraham Cemetery 555 Edgewood Place Ferndale 48220 810-399-0996 Jewish Cemetery Project
Beth Tefilo Cemetery 8 and Half Mile Road and Woodward Ave Ferndale Jewish Cemetery Project
Bigelow Cemetery Holly Road Davisburg, MI - Inactive
Bigler Cemetery Gunn & Kern Roads Lake Orion, MI -
Birmingham Cemetery Bloomfield Township - aka Greenwood Cemetery
Blakely Cemetery Milford Road Rose Township/nr Holly - Remains Removed
Bloomfield Center Cemetery Bloomfield Hills - Remains removed to Birmingham Cemetery
Boden Cemetery 8 Mile Road Southfield - Inactive
Brewster Cemetery Brewster Roard, Rochester MI - Inactive
Brookins Cemetery South Fenton Road - Holly - -
Cadillac Memorial Gardens 38425 Garfield Clinton Township 48043 - -
Care Memorial Cemetery Woodward & 12 Mile Roads Berkley, MI 48072 810-541-1154
Carmer Cemetery State Park Road-Old Brandon Township - Inactive
Case Cemetery Darmouth and Oak Hill Roads Clarkston - Inactive
Christian Memorial Cemetery 521 East Hamlin Road-Rochester 48307 - -
Clarkston Cemetery Clarkston No no longer in existence
Clover Hill Park Cemetery 3607 W 14 Mile Road-Royal Oak 48073 248-549-3411 -
Commerce Cemetery Commerce & Union Lake Roads-Commerce Township - Transcribed stones
Convenanters Cemetery Southfield - Burials recorded at MI State Library 1924
County Cemetery Section 13-Waterford Township - -
Crescent Hills Cemetery Crescent Lake & Tubbs Roads-Waterford Township - -
Crooks Road Cemetery Crooks Road-Troy - aka Boulan Park Cemetery
Davisburg Cemetery Davisburg Road-Davisburg - -
Del Smith Cemetery Chubb & 9 Mile Road-Salem - Inactive
Dominican Nuns Cemetery West Drahner Road-Oxford - -
Drayton Plains Cemetery US 10 & Williams Lake Road-Waterford - Drayton Plains Border
East Farmington Cemetery 12 Mile & Danvers Road-Farmington Township - Inactive
East Lawn Cemetery 37 E Flint Road-Lake Orion, 48362 - -
Eaton Cemetery Honery Road-Old Brandon Township - aka Honery Road Cemetery - Inactive
Evergreen Cemetery M 24 & West Church Street-Lake Orion - -
Fairview Cemetery 200 North First Street Brighton 48016 810-227-1911 -
Farmington Cemetery East Bet 13 & 14 Mile Roads Farmington, MI - -
Farmington Quaker Cemetery Gill Road-Farmington - -
Four Towns Cemetery Cooley Lake & Jay Roads-Waterford Township - -
Franklin Cemetery Franklin Rd & Scenic Rd-Village of Franklin - -
Gilbert Lake Cemetery Royal Oak, MI - aka Roseland Cemetery
Granger Cemetery Pontiac Lake Road-White Lake Township - -
Greenwood Cemetery Oak Street-Birmingham - Book Available at: Oakland Co Research Library
Hadley Cemetery Dixie Highway-Holly, MI - Old Groveland Township
Hannon Burials Milford Road-New Hudson - Abandoned
Highland Cemetery N Milford Road-Highland Township - -
Hillsdale Cemetery Highland Township - No known Information
Hillview Memorial Gardens Andersonville Road-Clarkston - -
Holy Sepulchre Cemetery 10 Mile Road-Southfield 248-350-1900 Some stones transcribed
Independence Township Lakeview Cemetery 6050 Flemings Lake Rd-Clarkston 48346 810-625-4146 -
Kensington Cemetery Old Lyon Township - Burials recorded at MI State Library 1924
Kent Cemetery Grand River-New Hudson, MI - Inactive
Kingsburg Cemetery Addison Township - Burials recorded at MI State Library 1924
Kline Cemetery Rochester & Stoney Creek Rds-Rochester - Inactive
Knapp Cemetery 9 Mile Road-Novi Inactive Partial Stones
Lady of Sorrow Cemetery Drahner Rd-Oxford Township - -
Lakeside Cemetery Thomas Street-Holly, MI - -
Lakeside Cemetery Elizabeth Lake Rd-White Lake Township - aka Oxbow Cemetery
Lakeview Cemetery 6150 White Lake Road-Clarkston, 48346 810-625-4146 -
Lakeville Cemetery Addison Township - Burials recorded MI State Library 1924
Machpelah Cemetery 21701 Woodward Ave-Ferndale 248-542-1146 -
Michigan Cemetery 2700 S Rochester Rd-Rochester, MI 248-299-5805 -
Milford Memorial Cemetery Wixom Road-Milford Township - -
Mitchell Family Cemetery Mitchell Rd-Holly Township - Abandoned
Mount Avon Cemetery 400 6th Street-Rochester 248-651-9061 Book Available at: Oakland Co Research Library
Mount Bethel Cemetery Bald Eagle Lake Rd-Ortonville - -
Mount Hope Catholic Cemetery 727 Orchard Lake Rd-Pontiac, 48341 248-332-1079 -
Mount Pleasant Cemetery Oakwood Rd-Oxford Township - Transcribed Stones
New Hudson Cemetery Milford Rd-New Hudson, MI - -
North Farmington Cemetery Farmington Rd-Farmington, MI -  
North Oxford Cemetery N Oxford Rd-Oxford, MI - -
Novi Cemetery Novi Road-Novi, MI - -
Oak Grove Cemetery Mt Eagle Road-Milford - -
Oak Grove Cemetery Garden Road-Milford Township - -
Oakland County Cemetery West Boulevard-Pontiac, MI - Book Available at: Oakland Co Research Library
Oak Hill Cemetery Grange Hall Rd-Holly Township - -
Oakhills Cemetery 216 University Dr-Pontiac, 48342 - -
Oakland Hills Memorial Gardens 43300 12 Mile Rd-Novi, 48377 810-349-2784 -
Oakview Cemetery 1032 North Main Street-Royal Oak 248-541-0139 -
Oakwood Cemetery Grand River & Farmington Roads Farmington, MI -
Oakwood Cemetery Old Brandon Township - Burials Recorded at MI State Library 1924
Ogden Cemetery Nrodge Lake Rd-Davisburg - Inactive
Old East Lawn Cemetery Orion Road-Lake Orion - -
Olive Branch Cemetery Davisburg area - Burials recorded MI State Library 1924
Ortonville Cemetery Ortonville, MI - -
Ottawa Park Cemetery 6180 Dixie Highway-Clarkston, 48346 248-623-9112 -
Our Lady of Sorrows West Drahner Road-Oxford, MI - -
Oxbow Cemetery Elizabeth Lake Road - Union Lake, MI - -
Oxford Township Cemetery Burdick Street-Oxford, MI - -
Paint Creek Cemetery Rochester, MI - -
Perry Cemetery Lake Orion, MI - -
Perry Mount Park Cemetery 878 N Perry Street-Pontiac, 48340 248-334-1563 -
Porter Family Cemetery Bloomfield Township no phone Inactive
Quaker Cemetery not located - -
Reformed Covenaters Cemetery not located - -
Resurrection Cemetery 18201 Clinton River Rd-Clinton Twp 810-286-9020 -
Richardson Cemetery Walled Lake, MI no phone Inactive
Ridgelawn Cemetery 99 W Burdick Street-Oxford, 48371 248-628-6244 -
Rose Township Cemetery Rose Township, MI no phone Inactive
Roseland Park Cemetery 29001 N Woodward Ave-Berkley, 48072 248-541-1154 Partial Transcribed
Roseland Park Cemetery (2) 1512 N Woodward Ave-Royal Oak, 48067 248-542-7610 -
Rosepark Cemetery Pontiac, MI - Book Available at: Oakland Co Research Library
Royal Oak Cemetery 1600 N Campbell Street-Royal Oak, 48067 248-544-8710 Stones Transcribed off site
Sashabaw Cemetery 5331 Maybee Road-Clarkston, MI off site Stones Transcribed
Seaver Cemetery not located no phone -
Seymour Lake Cemetery Seymour Lake Rd-Ortonville, 48462 248-627-2851 -
Shurter Cemetery Not located no phone -
South Lyon Cemetery South Lyon, MI - -
Southfield Pioneer Cemetery Southfield, MI - Stones Transcribed off site
Southfield Center Cemetery 24366 W 10 & Half Mile Rd-Southfield, 48075 - -
Southfield Reformed Presbyterian Cemetery Southfield, MI - -
Springfield Plains Cemetery Ortonville, MI - -
Square Lake Cemetery Oxford, MI - -
St Mary's Catholic Cemetery Milford, MI off site Stones Transcribed
St Mary's Catholic Cemetery North Main Street-Royal Oak off site Stones Transcribed
St Patrick's Catholic Cemetery 711 Rickett Road-Brighton, MI 48016 - -
Stoney Creek Cemetery Avon Township, MI - -
Troy Union Cemetery Birmingham, MI - -
Vaughn Cemetery not located no phone -
Walled Lake Cemetery Ladd Road-Walled Lake, 48390 248-624-4847 -
Waterford Center Cemetery Pontiac Lake & Airport Rd-Waterford, 48329 810-674-3111 -
Waterford Village Cemetery Cippard Street-Waterford 48329 - Established 1826
Waugh-Payne Cemetery not located no phone -
West Highland Cemetery Highland Township, MI - -
White Chapel Memorial Gardens (1) 19111 W 10 Mile Road-Southfield, 48075 248-353-9930 Partial
White Chapel Memorial Cemetery (2) 621 W Long Lake Rd- Troy 48098 248-362-7670 Partial
White Lake Cemetery 7525 Highland Rd-White Lake, MI 48383 248-698-3300 Stones Transcribed
Wixom Cemetery Pontiac Trail-Wixom, MI off site Stones Transcribed
Workmans Circle Cemetery 33550 Gratiot Ave-Clinton Township 48035 - -


 

Hi and welcome to the Oceana County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

We're really glad you stopped by and I hope that you find this website useful for your genealogical research.

The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Oceana County.

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Hi and welcome to the Ogemaw County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Ogemaw County.

Ogemaw County was named after the Indian title "chief" and in the Chippewa language is pronounced as "Ogemaw". This county was set off in 1840 and was abolished and incorporated into Iosco County. It was again set off in 1873 and organized in 1875.

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Hi and welcome to the Osceloa County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Osceloa County.

Osceloa County was set off in 1840 as Unwattin County and renamed in 1843 as Osceola. This county was named after a Seminole Indian warrior, Chief Osceola, who fought the U.S. in the Second Seminole War in 1837. The county was organized in 1869. County Seat: Reed City.

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Hi and welcome to the Osconda County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Osconda County.

 

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Hi and welcome to the Otsego County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Otsego County.

In 1840 Otsego County was originally named Okkuddo County and in 1843 it was changed to Otsego County. It was organized in 1875 and it's name means 'place of rock'.

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Hi and welcome to the Ottawa County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Ottawa County.

Ottawa County was organized in 1837 and was named after the Ottawa Indian tribe that had lived along the banks of the Grand River.

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Hi and welcome to the Presque Isle County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Presque Isle County.

Presque Isle County was set off in 1840, organized in 1871 and reorganized in 1875. It's name means narrow peninsula.

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Hi and welcome to the Roscommon County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Roscommon County.

Roscommon County was set off in 1840 as Mikenauk County. It had been inhabited by both Chippewa and Ottawa tribes. In 1843 it was renamed Roscommon for a sister county in Ireland. It was organized in 1875.

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Hi and welcome to the St. Clair County Michigan website. This website is hosted by Melissa Moore. Please Contact Me if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

I'm really glad you stopped by and I hope that you find this website useful for your genealogical research.

St. Clair is situated in the eastern of the state, on the St. Clair river and Lake Huron, and is bounded as follows: On the north by Sanilac county, on the east by Lake Huron and River St. Clair, which separates it from the Province of Upper Canada, south by Lake St. Clair and Macomb county, and west by Macomb and Lapeer counties. It contains 948 square miles. It is watered by the Black, Belle, Pine, and Swan rivers, and Mill creek. The surface is undulating, and the soil in the southern part, consisting of a black loam, is fertile, and that in the north and west somewhat sandy. It is heavily timbered with oak, pine, and other timber. (Michigan State Gazetter, 1863/1864)

Original St Clair website

The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for St Clair County.

Links related to St Clair County

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Can you help identify the location of the known cemeteries in St Clair County?   If so, please e-mail me with with the name of the cemetery and location.  Do you have a transcription of a cemetery in St Clair County?   Would you consider allowing me to post it on-line?

  • Adair Cemetery
  • Baker Cemetery
  • Balfour Cemetery
  • Bartlett Cemetery
  • Bowman Cemetery
  • Capac Cemetery
  • Caswell Cemetery
  • Columbus Cemetery
  • East Berlin Cemetery
  • Elmwood Cemetery
  • Goodells Poor Farm Cemetery
  • Greenwood Cemetery
  • Harmony Cemetery
  • Hillside Cemetery
  • Holy Cross Cemetery
  • Kenockee School (historical)
  • Kinney Cemetery
  • Kittridge Cemetery
  • Lakeport Cemetery
  • Lakeside Cemetery
  • Lambs Cemetery
  • Lett Cemetery
  • Lutheran Cemetery
  • Lynn Township Cemetery
  • Mallory Cemetery
  • McFadden Cemetery
  • Moore Cemetery
  • Moore Cemetery
  • Mount Hope Cemetery
  • Mount Pleasant Cemetery
  • Mount Sinai Cemetery
  • Oaklawn Cemetery
  • Our Lady of Mount Carmel Cemetery
  • Pine Hill Cemetery
  • Pinewood Cemetery
  • Rattle Run Cemetery
  • Riverlawn Cemetery
  • Rose Hill Cemetery
  • Ruby Cemetery
  • Sacred Heart Cemetery
  • Sacred Heart Cemetery
  • Saint Catherine Cemetery
  • Saint Lawrence Cemetery
  • Saint Marys Cemetery
  • Saint Marys Cemetery
  • Saint Marys Cemetery
  • Saint Marys Cemetery
  • Saint Paul's Lutheran Cemetery
  • Saint Peter's Lutheran Cemetery
  • Saint Philip Neri Cemetery
  • Smith Cemetery
  • Spring Hill Cemetery
  • Starville Cemetery
  • Strevel Cemetery
  • Sunset Memorial Gardens
  • Tibbetts Road Cemetery
  • United Brethren Cemetery
  • Veterans Cemetery
  • West Berlin Cemetery
  • Westbrook Cemetery
  • Williams Cemetery
  • Woodlawn Cemetery
  • Woodlawn Cemetery

Find A Grave has a number of cemetery transcriptions on-line for St Clair County.

Interment has a number of cemetery transcriptions on-line for St Clair County.
Cemetery List, St Clair County

St.Clair County Townships

Berlin Brockway Burchville Clyde
Casco China Clay Columbus
Cottrelville East China Emmet Greenwood
Ira Kenockee Kimball Lynn
Mussey Port Huron Riley St. Clair
Wales - - -

 

St. Clair County, MI
1840 Census Index
Roll #M704-210

 

1850 St. Clair, MI, Census Index
by Twp & Village

Index of Twps Roll # M432-362
Berlin Township Brockway Township
Burtchville Township Casco Township
China Township A - H China Township I - R
China Township R - Z Clay Township A - L
Clay Township L - Z Clyde Township A - L
Clyde Township L - Z Columbus Township
Cottreville Township A - L Cottreville Township L - Z
Ira Township Lynn Township
Port Huron Township A - L Port Huron Township L - Z
Port Huron Village A - D Port Huron Village D - H
Port Huron Village H - N Port Huron Village N - S
Port Huron Village S - Z St. Clair Township A - D
St. Clair Township D - L St. Clair Township L - S
St. Clair Township S - Z Wales Township

Contributed by Deb Axtman

 

Hi and welcome to the St Joseph County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for St Joseph County.

St. Joseph County was officially organized in 1829 and was named for Saint Joseph, the patron saint of New France. The county seat is located in Centreville.

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Hi and welcome to the Schoolcraft County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Schoolcraft County.

Schoolcraft County was set off in 1843 and officially organized in 1871. It was named for Henry R. Schoolcraft, Indian Agent and author.

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Hi and welcome to the Shiawassee County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Shiawassee County.

A very special thanks to Bonnie McVicar-Briggs who graciously donated the content of her Shiawassee website when she stepped down as coordinator.

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The information about the location of active, inactive and abandoned cemeteries in Shiawassee County was provided by the County Clerks office. Cemeteries are listed by township. Editor's note: There are two Pine Tree Cemeteries listed. One in Burns Twp. and the other in Caledonia Twp.

ANTRIM TOWNSHIP

ANTRIM MISSION CEMETERY: Site obliterated.
It was located in section 18, on Britton Road. Graves were moved to Bethany Cemetery. This was a Catholic cemetery.

BEARD CEMETERY: Inactive.
Located in section 19, at Cork and Beard Roads. It is township owned. Burials were recorded at the State of Michigan Library in Lansing.

DURFEE (MAINE) CEMETERY: Inactive.
Located in section 33, on Scribner Road. It is township owned and recorded at the State of Michigan Library in Lansing.

GLASS RIVER CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 21, on Ellsworth and Godfrey Roads. It is township owned and recorded at the State of Michigan Library.

MELVIN GRAVE: Single grave.
Located in section 19, on Beard Road is the grave of Lyman Melvin. He died 13 Feb. 1850.

BENNINGTON TOWNSHIP

ALITON CEMETERY; INACTIVE.
The location of this cemetery is unknown but the burials are recorded at the State of Michigan Library.

ALTON CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 23, on W. Grand River Road. It is township owned and is recorded at the State of Michigan Library in Lansing.

HOWARD CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 36, on W. Tyrell Road. It is township owned and recorded at the State of Michigan Library.

OAKWOOD CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 3, at Bennington and M-52 Roads. It is township owned and recorded at the State of Michigan Library.

BURNS TOWNSHIP

BURGESS CEMETERY: Inactive.
Located in section 9, four miles south of Durand on Cole Rd. Near Barnes Rd. Burials recorded at State of Michigan Library.

BYRON CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 24, in the village of Byron. It is village owned.

KNAGG'S BRIDGE CEMETERY: Inactive.
Located in section 2, on Miller Road. It is township owned and recorded at the State of Michigan Library.

PINE TREE CEMETERY: Inactive.
Located in section 9, on Cole Road. Township owned.

UNKNOWN CEMETERY: Inactive.
Location is unknown, but burials are recorded at the State of Michigan Library.

UNION PLAINS CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 17, at Grand River and Reed Roads. Association owned.

CALEDONIA TOWNSHIP

COUNTY POOR FARM CEMETERY: Inactive.
Located in section 32, on Lyons Road. It is county owned.

HAWKINS (ACKERSON) CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 25, on Lytle Road. It is township owned and recorded at the State of Michigan Library.

OWOSSO CEMETERY: Site obliterated.
Was located in Section 18, in Owosso. Graves were moved to Oak Hill Cemetery in the 1870's.

PINETREE CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 21 in Corunna. City owned.

ST. MARY'S CATHOLIC CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 33, at State and Hibbard Roads. Church owned.

FAIRFIELD TOWNSHIP

FAIRFIELD #1 CEMETERY: Inactive.
Located in section 26, at Vincent and Riley Roads. It is township owned and recorded at the State of Michigan Library.

FAIRFIELD #2 CEMETERY : Active.
Located in section 26, at Vincent and Juddville Roads. Township owned.

HAZELTON TOWNSHIP

CUMMINS (JUDDS CORNERS) CEMETERY: Abandoned.
Located in section 34, on New Lothrop Road. It is recorded at the State of Michigan Library.

ELMWOOD CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 11, in New Lothrop. Township owned.

NORTH RIDGE CEMETERY: Abandoned.
Located in section 6, on North Ridge Road. It is recorded at the State of Michigan Library.

VIETZ CEMETERY: Site obliterated.
Located in section 7, on Easton Road.

MIDDLEBURY CEMETERY

MIDDLEBURY CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 27 on Krouse Road. Township owned.

NEW HAVEN TOWNSHIP

EASTON CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 10, on Easton Road. Township owned.

NEW HAVEN CEMETERY: Inactive.
Located in section 18, at Seymour and Henderson Roads. It is township owned and recorded at the State of Michigan Library.

WEST HAVEN CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 19, at Seymour and Henderson Roads. Township owned.

OWOSSO TOWNSHIP AND CITY

CARSON CEMETERY: Site obliterated.
Located in section 11, on Wilkinson Road.

DYNES CEMETERY:
Located in section 35, at Delaney and M-47 Roads. Bodies moved to Hillcrest Cemetery in 1923.

HILLCREST MEMORIAL GARDENS: Active.
Located in section 24, in Owosso. Corporation owned.

OAK GROVE (DEWEY) CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 20, on Sherman Road. Township owned.

OAK HILL CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 24, on Washington Street in Owosso. Corporation owned.

ST. PAUL'S CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 25, on Morrice Road. Owned by St. Paul's Church.

PERRY TOWNSHIP

BETHANY CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 14, on Morrice Road. This is a Catholic cemetery and is church owned.

PERRY CEMETERY: Now part of Roselawn Cemetery.

ROSELAWN CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 23, on Ellsworth Road. It is township owned and recorded at the State of Michigan Library.

RUSH TOWNSHIP

MT. HOPE (HENDERSON) CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 25, at M-47 and Juddville Roads. It is township owned and recorded at the State of Michigan Library.

NEW RIVERSIDE CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 23, on Chipman Road. Township owned.

RIVERSIDE CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 23, on Chipman Road. It is township owned and recorded at the State of Michigan Library.

SCIOTA TOWNSHIP

LAINGSBURG CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 21, on Woodbury Road. Association owned.

MT. OLIVET CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 21. Catholic cemetery. Church owned.

PUTNAM CEMETERY: INACTIVE.
Location unknown. Burials are recorded at the State of Michigan Library in Lansing.

SCIOTA #2 CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 3, on Putnam Road. It is township owned and recorded at the State of Michigan Library.

SHIAWASSEE TOWNSHIP

FREMONT CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 27, on Grand River Road. Township owned.

HOARD CEMETERY: Inactive.
Located in section 33, at State and Tyrell Roads. Association owned. Burials recorded at the State of Michigan Library.

MAPLE RIVER CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 7 at Bennington and Colby Roads. It is association owned and recorded at the State of Michigan Library.

NEWBURG (SOUTH NEWBURG) CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 14, in Bancroft. It is township owned and recorded at the State of Michigan Library.

VENICE TOWNSHIP

WILKINSON CEMETERY:Active.
Located in section 7, at Shipman and Vernon Roads. It is township owned and recorded at the State of Michigan Library.

YERIAN (SOUTH VENICE) CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 33, at Yerian and Brooks Roads. It is township owned and recorded at the State of Michigan Library.

VERNON TOWNSHIP

CHALKER CEMETERY: Abandoned.
Located in section 4, on Durand Road.

GARDENER GRAVE: Inactive.
Located in section 22, in Durand. Grave of Loren Gardner. Burial recorded at State of Michigan Library.

GREENWOOD CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 6, in Vernon. Corporation owned.

LOVEJOY CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 33, on Prior Road. Association owned.

WOODHULL TOWNSHIP

GRAHAM CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 9, at Pulver and Britton Roads. It is township owned and recorded at the State of Michigan Library.

KAY FAMILY CEMETERY: Inactive.
Located in section 13, on Britton Road. Privately owned.

OAK PLAIN CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 24, on Shaftsburg Road. Township owned.

ST. PATRICK'S (CORCORAN) CEMETERY: Active.
Located in section 33, on Woodbury Road. Catholic cemetery. Church owned. Burials recorded at State of Michigan Library.

SHAFTSBURG CEMETERY: Site obliterated.
Located in section 23, on Beard Road. Bodies moved to Oak Plain Cemetery.

SPRAGUE CEMETERY: Inactive.
Located in section 4, on Winegar Road. All but one grave moved to Graham Cemetery.

UNKNOWN CEMETERY: Site obliterated.
Located in section 12, on Britton Road.

 

If you are interested in transcribing any of these cemeteries, in whole or part, please contact us.

Index for obituaries that appeared in the Argus Press Newspaper.

Hi and welcome to the Van Buren County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

We're really glad you stopped by and I hope that you find this website useful for your genealogical research.

The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Van Buren County.

Van Buren county was established in 1837 and formed in 1840 from Warren and White counties. This county was named after Martin Van Buren the then Secretary of State and the latter President of the United States. The county seat is Spencer.

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Hi and welcome to the Washtenaw County Michigan website. This website is in need of a County Team Associate. Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

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The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Washtenaw County.

Washtenaw County was formally organized in 1826 and established in 1827. The named for this county is from the Chippewa word "wash-ten-ong," meaning at or on the river. It is said to have referred to the Huron River which flows through the area.

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Hi and welcome to the Wayne County Michigan website. Wayne county is hosted by Nathan Zipfel.  Please Contact Us if you'd be interesting in helping to develop this resource.

We're really glad you stopped by and I hope that you find this website useful for your genealogical research.

The links below will take you to the various DataBoards and other resources for Wayne County.

Wayne is the most populous county in the state, and in point of manufactures and commercial advantages, it is far in advance of all others. It is in the south-eastern part of the state, and is bounded on the north by Oakland and Macomb, east by Lake St. Clair and Detroit river, south by Monroe county, and west by Washtenaw, and contains about 600 square miles.(Michigan State Gazetter, 1863/1864)

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Much of the data on the following pages was originally created by Linda Ball.  We thank her for allowing us to continue maintaining it on-line.

Need help locating a cemetery  There is a book available through the Library of Michigan that can help you. It is a book of county maps that includes the location of each cemetery in the county. This book is probably available in various other libraries but can also be purchased from the Library of Michigan.

To purchase the County Map Book send a check or money order to:
Library of Michigan
P.O. Box 30007
717 W. Allegan St.
Lansing, MI 48909
cost:$25.00

Name Address City Zip Phone Partial or Full Transcribed Special Comments
Adat Shalom Memorial Park 28500 W. Six Mile Road Livonia  48152 734-421-7915   aka Northwest Hebrew Cemetery
Assumption Grotto Cemetery  Gratiot Ave bet 6 Mile & Maple Ridge Detroit       aka Assumption Cemetery
Bethel Memorial Park 28120 6 Mile Road Livonia 48152-3662 (313)421-5680   aka Beth El Memorial
Beth Olam Cemetery Bet Smith and Clay Streets Hamtramck     Complete Listing Closed over 50yrs | Open to public twice a year
Bloomdale Cemetery King Road Trenton       City Owned, City retains records
Briggs Cemetery Six Mile Road East of Haggerty Livonia     Partial Listing  
Bnai-David Cemetery 9535 Van Dyke Detroit 48213-1056 (313)923-0771   aka Congregation B' nai David Cemetery
Cadillac Memorial Gardens West 34224 Ford Road Westland 48185-3051 (313)721-7161 Partial only  
Cady Cemetery  Cady Street  Northville     Complete Transcription  aka Old Northville Cemetery
Champlain Street Cemetery 3371 East Lafayette Detroit/Hamtramck Border     Closed 1950s. Records at Temple Beth El Birmingham, MI
Cherry Hill Cemetery  Ridge Rd, S. of Cherry Hill Canton Twp 48186  (734)665-3658 Partial Transcription  Active and Open , well maintained
Chubb Cemetery 38450 Warren Ave West of Hix Road Westland 48186   Complete Transcription Historical Site - poor condition
Clarenceville Cemetery Eight Mile, E. of Middlebelt Livonia 48152      
Congregation B'nai David Cemetery 9535 Van Dyke Detroit       See B' nai David Cemetery
Crouch Cemetery  Grindley Park betw. Oxford & Princeton Sts. Dearborn 48125 non - existant    Crouch Family burial a 36 x 70 foot lot, in now a Dearborn Subdivision | Vacated 1927 bodies removed to "other city cemeteries"
Denton Cemetery Cross Street South of Mich Ave Van Buren       Off Site, By: Dyane 
Detroit Memorial Park 25200 Plymouth Road Redford 48239-2019 (313)533-1302   aka National Memorial Gardens
Downer Cemetery Old Michigan Ave east of Haggerty Road Canton 48186   Complete Transcription Burials date back to 1832
East Rockwood Cemetery  Lee & River Roads,  Brownstown Twp.       Established 1844, now abandoned
Elmwood Cemetery 1200 Elmwood St. Detroit 48207-3897 (313)567-3453 Partial Only 83 acres. Organized in 1846
Eloise Cemetery Henry Ruff Rd. Westland 48185 734-727-7377 "Friends of Eloise" organizing Markers #'s only-No Names
English Burying Ground Woodward & Larned Detroit 48202 non - existant    Remains removed bet 1820-1830|aka Old Woodward Ave Cemetery
Evergreen Cemetery 19807 Woodward Avenue Detroit 48203-1593 (313)368-1330   276 acres. Incorporated in 1905
Evergreen Cemetery Warren Avenue at Asbury Park Detroit 482  (313)  next to Wm S. Ford Memorial United Methodist Church  Founded 1844. aka Scotch Settlement Cemetery, org portion is now covered by Warren Ave, no graves were affected
Felt Cemetery Waltz & Ash Roads Huron Twp.        
Ferndale Cemetery 14732 Sibley Road-just west of Fort St Riverview 48192-7754 (734)282-3145 partial listing Dedicated 1915
Ford Family Cemetery 15801 Joy Road Detroit     Ford Family & Ruddiman Family among others buried here.  some remains removed to Grand Lawn Cemetery | est 1832 | St Martha Episcopal Church along front.
Forest Hill Cemetery 18431 Greydale Avenue Detroit 48219-2417 (313)531-7676   5 acres | aka Greenfield Township Cemetery
Forest Lawn Cemetery 11851 Van Dyke Street Detroit 48234-4190 (313)921-6960 Partial Transcription  130 acres | Established 1888
Fort Shelby Cemetery Near Cass bet Michigan Ave & Fort Streets Detroit       aka Military Reserve Cemetery | not formally vacated, but some remains removed to City Cemeteries
Ganong Cemetery 3036 Henry Ruff Rd. Westland 48185   Complete aka William Ganong Cemetery
Gethsemane Cemetery 10755 Gratiot Avenue Detroit 48213-1226 (313)921-6650    
Gibraltar Cemetery S. Gibraltar Rd. Gibraltar       Established 1854
Glen Eden Memorial Park 35667 8 Mile Rd. Livonia 48152-1150 (248)477-4460    
Glenwood Cemetery 33501 Glenwood - bet Venoy & Wayne Rd Wayne 48184 (313)722-2000 Partial Transcription Active & Open
Grand Lawn Cemetery 23501 Grand River Detroit 48219-3166 313-531-2050   Established 1905
Grosse Ile Memorial Cemetery 10056 Groh Rd. Grosse Ile   734-675-5366    
Grosse Pointe Cemetery Gunston & Hein Streets Grosse Pointe/Detroit Border       4,500 remains removed to Russell Street Cemtery 1880-1882
Hillside Cemetery Denton Rd Van Buren/Belleville       Dates back to 1840s
Holy Cross Cemetery 8850 Dix Street Detroit 48209-1093 (313)841-0545   39 acres. Early records destroyed in 1908 fire (stones still there)
Huron Valley Cemetery 27009 Inkster Road Flat Rock 48134-9435 (313)782-9415   dates back to 1926
Indian Burial Ground Michigan Avenue, west of Greenfield Dearborn 48126 (313)none located on Rouge River Bank Indian burial grounds, excavated
 
Island Memorial Park Cemetery 27383 West River Road Grosse Ile      : Established in 1961
Kenyon Cemetery Ridge & Gyde Roads Canton     Partial Transcription  aka Kinyon | Established 1840 | was within Plymouth Twp-Now Canton
Kittle Cemetery West Rd - east of Merriman Huron Twp.       Family Owned
Knapp-Aldrich 43005 9 Mile Road  Northville - Novi     Complete Transcription  
Knollwood Memorial Park Cemetery 1299 Ridge Road Canton     Partial Transcription  Corportion Owned
Krause Cemetery Huron River Dr-bet West & King Roads Huron Twp.       Est 1883 | now abandoned
Livonia Cemetery 15837 Farmington Rd-South of 5 Mile Livonia 48152   Partial Transcription Opened prior to Civil War
Mallett Cemetery Intersection of CLark and Savage Roads Huron Township-near New Boston        
Maple Grove Cemetery Ann Arbor Trail -just West of Dearborn Hgts Westland 48185   Partial Listing Established abt 1876-Active | 26 acres, much of it still vacant
Maple Grove Cemetery Telegraph Road Flat Rock 48124 (313)563-5151    
Martinsville Cemetery WillisRoad East of Sumpter Road Belleville 48111      
Mason Street Cemetery North Corner of Mason at Monroe Avenues Dearborn 48125 (313)none  aka Little Sloss Cemetery  Non Existant|All remains removed 1916 to Northview-along Outer Drive
Masonic Public Cemetery Jefferson Ave & Fifth Street Trenton       No longer Active | aka Masonic Cemetery
Meadowcrest Memorial Assn. 5800 E. Davison Street Detroit 48212-1350 (313)891-2429    
Metropolitan Memorial Gardens 48300 Willow Rd-West of Sumpter Rd Belleville 48111-9635  (313)963-7280    
Michigan Memorial Park Cemetery W Huron River Drive Flat Rock 481     Over 53,000 burials-Open & Active
Mount Carmel Cemetery 1123 2ND St at Ford Ave Wyandotte 48192 (313)285-1722   Dedicated Aug 20,1865 | some records destroyed in 1919 fire
Mount Elliot Cemetery 1701 Mount Elliott St Detroit 48207-3400 (313)567-0048 Partial Transcription  Established 1841 | aka Trinity Church Cemetery
Mount Hazel Cemetery Lahser and 7 Mile Road Detroit 48219-2417 (313)531-7677 Complete Transcription  
Mount Hope Memorial Garden 17840 Middlebelt Road & 6 Mile Livonia 48152-3610 (313)522-2200   aka Brookdale Memorial Park
Mount Kelley Cemetery Cherry Hill & Martha St. Dearborn 48128   Partial Only Est 1858 | aka Sacred Heart Cemetery
Mount Olivet Cemetery 6 Mile Road & Van Dyke Detroit 48234  (313)365-5650 Partial Transcription  Est 1886 | 293 acres
National Memorial Gardens 25200 Plymouth Rd. Redford 48239 Partial Transcription Many Area Veterans-WWI, WWII, Korea, Vietnam
Newburgh Cemetery 36725 Ann Arbor Trail bet Wayne & Newburgh Livonia 48152   Partial Transcription First burial 1827 | Mich Historic Site-Active,/td>
Northview Cemetery Kensington & W Outer Dr Dearborn 48128  (313)565-0005 Partial Listing Established abt 1883-Open | 18.5 acres | all plots sold
Northwest Hebrew Cemetery 28500 6 Mile Rd. Livonia 48152      
Nowland Cemetery Southeast Corner of Huron River Drive Huron Twp.       Est 1866
Nowlin Cemetery Van Born Rd East of Telegraph Dearborn Heights 48125   Complete Transcription- not only Nowlin Family burials Est prior to 1886 | aka Wm Nowlin Cemetery | Inactive | incare of: Dearborn Hts Historical Museum
Oakdale Cemetery 15995 S.Telegraph Road Taylor 48181   Complete Transcription inactive | dates back to 1830
Oak Forest Cemetery Huron River Dr bet Inkster Rd & Arsenal Flat Rock 48134     Dates back to 1840's
Oak Grove Cemetery Burr Street South of VanBorn Taylor 48181   Partial Transcription Est 1860 | now abandoned
Oak Ridge Cemetery 23723 Telegraph Rd Flat Rock 48134-9221 (313)675-0660   Est 1880
Oakwood Cemetery Will Carleton Rd West of Telegraph Huron Township        
Oakwood Cemetery 45 Vinewood - South of Biddle Wyandotte       1st cemetery in this city dates back to 1850
Old Baptist Cemetery York & Pearl West of Plymouth Road Plymouth Township   no phone  Complete Transcription aka Plymouth Village Cemetery | Founded 1845 | No longer open
Old Hill Cemetery North Bank of Rouge River, 2 Miles South of Mich Ave Dearborn 48126   aka Old Potawatami Burial Grounds  Non Existant| some earliest Dbn residents were buried here | vacated in 1935 | bodies removed to "another cemetery"
Old Wayne Cemetery 35448 Michigan Avenue Wayne 48184 n-a Partial Transcription Inactive-Historical Site
Otisville Cemetery Riggs Road bet Sumpter & Haggerty Van Buren Township     Surname Index  Name Derived from Otisville, now non-existent town | Est 1850
Our Lady of Hope Cemetery 18303 Allen Road Wyandotte 48192-8402 (734)285-2155 partial list  Est 1962
Parish Family Burial Ground Ridge Road Canton       Remains removed 1863-65 to Kenyon Cemetery
Parkview Memorial Cemetery 34205 5 Mile Rd Livonia 48154-2699  (313)421-6120 Partial Transcription  Est 1926
Pepper Road Cemetery Oakwood Blvd (off old Pepper Rd) now Village Road Dearborn 48126 (313)none  No Longer Exists (was Sloss Farm)  abandoned Oct 2, 1914. Bodies removed to Northview & Woodmere. 2 bodies found in 1948 during For Motor Comp excavation.
Perfect Care 17211 Braile Street Detroit 48219-3980 (313)531-5393    
Presbyterian Cemetery Church Street West of Main Plymouth Township       Open bet 1825-1915 some remains moved , others found in 1936
Redford Bell Branch Vets aka Redford Cemetery
Bell Branch (non Vets)
Telegraph Rd North of 5 Mile Rd Redford 48239   Complete Transcription  aka Redford's Bell Branch Cemetery
Reves-Wilhelm Cemetery Wall Street bet Oakwood & Greenfield Melvindale       Est 1820s | vacated | Mich Historic Site #25
Riverside Cemetery 201 S. Main Street near Plymouth Rd & Lilley Plymouth 48170-1637 (313)453-7737 Partial Transcription Est 1880
Romulus Cemetery Shook & McBride Roads Romulus       Partial Update - Dated 1833
Rucker Cemetery 22975 W. River Rd. Grosse Ile. Twp.       aka Fox-Rucker Cemetery | est 1845
Rural Hill Cemetery 7 Mile & Sheldon Northville     Partial Transcription  Est 1885 | no written records avail prior to 1937
Russell Street Cemetery Russell Street & Gratiot Detroit       Est 1834 | vacated to Grosse Ise Cemetery 1882
Sacred Heart Cemetery 21526 E River Road Grosse Ile       Est 1887
Sacred Heart of St. Mary's Cemetery 5800 E Davison & 6 Mile (McNicholas) Detroit 48212-1350 (313)366-0274   owned by Sweetest Heart of St Mary's Parish located on Canfield Street, Detroit
Shearer Cemetery 45452 N Territorial Rd Plymouth Township 48170 no phone  Complete Transcription  abandoned and no longer active
Sheldon Cemetery 3444 Sheldon Road Canton     Partial Transcription Est 1869 | 2 acres
Sloss Cemetery Oakwood Blvd East of Elm Street Dearborn 48125     Dated to 1863 | closed 1914 remains moved to Northview Cemetery
Smith-Fay Cemetery S Huron Drive North of Willow Rd Huron Township        
St Alphonsus Cemetery Schaefer Road and Warren Ave Dearborn 48126   Completely Transcribed Est 1850 | inactive
St Anne's Cemetery Jefferson Ave and Griswold Detroit 48202     Founded 1701 | 1798-removed to St Anne's Larned
St Anne's Cemetery-Larned Larned and Bates Streets Detroit     Detroit Historical Society Used until 1827 removed to St Antoine's Cemetery
St Antoine Street Cemetery St Antoine and Raynor Streets Detroit       Est 1827 | closed 1855-remaines moved to Mt Elliott Cemetery
St Francis Xavier Cemetery 3rd Street-North of Southfield Rd Ecorse       Est 1897
St Hedwig Cemetery 23755 Military Road at Ford Rd & Telegraph Dearborn Heights 48125 (313)562-1900 Partial Transcription Est 1920|Many East Eurp. Names
St Hedwig Church 3245 Junction Detroit 48210 (313)894-5409 Once the Parish Cemetery of St Hedwig Church once run by Franciscan Friars; in 1994 the Archdiocese took over the Church, however cemetery is Franciscan Run still
St Marys Cemetery Michigan Ave at Howe Road Wayne 48185   Partial has no fence | no sexton office |Open & Active
St John's Lutheran Cemetery Will Carlton & Waltz Road Huron Township        
St Stephen's Cemetery Clark & Savage Huron Twp-Near New Boston        
St Paul's Cemetery Moross Road & Country Club Lane Grosse Pointe Farms       Est 1868
St Peter's Evangelical Cemetery 15335 Gratiot South of 8 Mile Detroit        
Taylor Cemetery 11505 McKinley South of Goddard Taylor 48181 (313)531-7676 Complete Transcription aka Golden Ridge Cemetery | Organized 1840 | still open
Temple Beth El 3371 East Lafayette Detroit 482 (313) Complete Transcription Oldest Jewish Cemetery in Detroit
Trinity Lutheran Cemetery 5210 Mt. Elliott Detroit 48211 (313)921-0286   Est 1868 | 10 acres
Tyler Cemetery Tyler Street East I-275 Belleville 48111     Est 1834
Thayer Cemetery 6 Mile & Napier Northville     Complete Transcription  No longer active 
Union Chapel 27042 Michigan Ave Inkster 48141   Partial Listing No sexton's office, however is Open
Van Akin Cemetery Ann Arbor Trial Westland Michigan    Complete Transcription  is inside of Maple Grove Cemetery, now.
Vreeland Cemetery Will Carlton bet Telegraph & Inkster Rd Flat Rock       aka Freeland Cemetery | now abandoned
Waterford Cemetery Franklin Avenue Northville     Complete Transcription  No longer Active burials 
West Mound Cemetery/Taylor Methodist Eureka Ave bet I-75 & Telegraph Taylor 48181   Partial Transcription  Est 1883
Westlawn Cemetery 31472 Michigan Ave Wayne 48184-1413 (313)722-2530 Partial Only aka Clairview Cemetery
Woodlawn Cemetery 19975 Woodward Avenue Detroit 48203-1095 (313)368-0010 183 acres | still active
Woodmere Cemetery & Crematory 9400 W Fort Street Detroit   (313)841-0188  Partial Transcription  Opened 1869 | 202 acres | Active
Westwood Cemetery Michigan Ave Inkster 48141   Partial Transcription Jewish Cemetery/Active & Open
Wallaceville Cemetery 8050 North Gulley Dearborn Heights 48128   Completed Inactive | Michigan Historical Site
Yerkes Cemetery 8 Mile Rd bet Novi & Haggerty Northville     Complete  No longer active | Civil War Veteran burials 

 Wayne County Townships

Brownstown Township Canton Township Greenfield Township
[no longer exists]
Grosse Isle Township Huron Township Nankin Township
[no longer exists]
Northville Township Plymouth Township Redford Township
 Sumpter Township Van Buren Township  

Extinct Township, Towns and Villages

Wayne County Cities

  • Allen Park
  • Belleville
  • Dearborn
  • Dearborn Heights
  • Detroit
  • Ecorse
  • Flat Rock
  • Garden City
  • Gibraltar
  • Grosse Pointe
  • Grosse Pointe Farms
  • Grosse Pointe Park
  • Grosse Pointe Shores
  • Grosse Pointe Woods
  • Hamtramck
  • Harper Woods
  • Highland Park
  • Inkster
  • Lincoln Park
  • Livonia
  • Melvindale
  • Northville
  • Plymouth
  • River Rouge
  • Riverview
  • Rockwood
  • Romulus
  • Southgate
  • Taylor
  • Trenton
  • Wayne
  • Westland
  • Woodhaven
  • Wyandotte

 

Year Wayne Co Population Total Year Wayne Co Population Total
1800 3,206 1810 2,227
1820 3,574 1830 6,781
1840 24,173 1850 42,756
1860 75,547 1870 119,038
1880 166,444 1890 257,114
1900 348,793 1910 531,591
1920 1,177,645 1930 1,888,946
1940 2,015,623 1950 2,435,235

The region now known as Brownstown was, like surrounding areas in Michigan, once a part of the French Province Quebec. The area eventually fell into hands of the British and finally came under American rule in the 18th century. The original 43-square-mile area of land south of Detroit was designated a township by the Michigan Territorial Commission on April 5, 1827, when Moses Roberts was elected its first supervisor. This made Brownstown one of Wayne County's nine original townships.

Legend holds that the township was named for Adam Brown, who was kidnapped by the Wyandot Indians. Brown was raised by the Wyandots, married a native woman and grew to become a tribal leader. As time passed, settlements spread out from the lakeshore to begin changing the swampy, sand-hill countryside into productive farm land. Established in 1893 Kurtzhals Farm is one of the largest remaining farms in the township.

SOURCE:  Wikipedia

Earlier, on October 20, 1829, the legislature had passed a bill creating the townships of Lima and Richland out of Bucklin Township. Governor Lewis Cass returned the acts unapproved, citing a conflict under the law. The names conflicted with post offices in existence, contrary to a territorial law from April 12, 1827, prohibiting incorporation of a new township bearing the same name as any existing post office. The legislature thus had to substitute the names of Nankin and Pekin after the cities of Nanjing (Nanking) and Beijing (Peking) in China. The name of Pekin was extinguished when it was renamed Redford in 1833.

The Township of Canton was created by act of the Michigan Territorial Legislature on March 7, 1834 out of a southern portion of Plymouth Township. It was named in honor of the port and provincial capital known historically as Canton, Imperial China, which in 1918 was renamed Guangzhou — now the capital and largest city of Guangdong province, People's Republic of China.

The first meeting to organize the township was held in April 1834.

 

SOURCE:  Wikipedia

The area had been inhabited for thousands of years by varying indigenous peoples. Historical tribes belonged mostly to the Algonquian-language family, although the Huron were Iroquoian speaking.

The Dearborn area was settled by Europeans in 1786, after the American Revolutionary War.  Population growth led to Dearborn Township being formed in 1833 and the village of Dearbornville within it being established in 1836, both named after patriot Henry Dearborn, a General in the American Revolution and Secretary of War under President Thomas Jefferson. The town of Dearborn was incorporated in 1893, changing to a city in 1927. Its current borders trace back to a 1928 consolidation vote that established its present-day borders by merging Dearborn and neighboring Fordson (previously known as Springwells), which feared being absorbed into Detroit.

SOURCE:  Wikipedia

Dearborn Heights was incorporated from the two discontinuous sections of Dearborn Township and a quarter-mile connecting strip of land from the village of Inkster. Incorporation petitions were filed on Friday, March 4, 1960, while Inkster officials delivered their petitions for incorporation on Monday, March 7, 1960. The residents approved Dearborn Heights incorporation on an election held June 20, 1960, which is the official date of incorporation. Inkster filed a lawsuit that was not finally resolved until the Michigan Supreme Court handed down a decision favorable to Dearborn Heights on April 8, 1963.

SOURCE:  Wikipedia

The origins of Garden City started with the transfer of the property to John Lathers from Andrew Jackson for 160 acres (0.65 km2) in October 1835. The city was patterned after the "garden city" concept that became popular in England during the 19th century, with most home sites sectioned off into 1-acre (4,000 m2) plots to allow adequate farming area to support the family with fruit and vegetables. Now, most sites are considerably smaller, some as small as 40 feet by 135 feet, with little room for gardening of fruits and vegetables, though the city maintains some large lots where an extra street has not been placed between two of the older streets, such as between some parts of Bock Street and John Hauk Street where Donnelly Avenue does not cut through.

In June 1927, Garden City became a village, with Arnold Folker as Village President. Six years later the village became the city of Garden City. Areas of interest in Garden City include the first Kmart store (opened 1962 and still in use), the first Little Caesars (also still in use), and the first dine-in McDonalds in Michigan. The honeymoon cottage of Henry Ford and his wife, Clara Jane Bryant, was moved here from Dearborn in 1952.

SOURCE:  Wikipedia

Gibraltar
Wayne County, Michigan

The earliest residents in this area of Michigan, were the Wyandots (or Huron) Native Americans. They were under French control until the British captured Detroit in 1760. The early tribes used Gibraltar as the "Head Village." It was the headquarters of the Council House and the International Council Fires. Since the Wyandot were always a leading tribe in the Northwest Territory, the Great Council of the Confederacy was also held here.
The area was called, "Chenal de la Presque Isle" on early French maps. This roughly translates into "Channel of the near (or almost near) Island." The theory is that when the English began to settle in the area, they called it Gibraltar, which in their opinion, was the greatest rock of all. When original land plats were registered for the area, the spelling was "Gibralter." It was not until the year 1900, that the spelling was changed to "Gibraltar," which is the current spelling of today.
The Brownstown Treaty was signed in 1807, which opened up the southeastern portion of Michigan for survey, settlement, and new roads. West Jefferson Road follows along an old Native American trail traveling from Ohio to the north. It is said that in the spring, Native American families were travel north and leave their mares on what is now called Horse Island, to foal. The horses would live the summer on this island to feed and mate, and were picked up by the Natives on their return trip south, in the fall. The Native American tribes took advantage of the abundance of reeds for making baskets, and for the good hunting and fishing in the area.
Following the successful opening of the Erie Canal in 1825, local entrepreneurs had also invisioned builing such a canal to go from Gibraltar to Lake Michigan. The Gibralter-Flat Rock Land and Canal Company was organized on July 20, 1836, for this purpose. Their plans were to build a canal between Gibraltar and Flat Rock, extending to Ypsilanti, with an ultimate goal of reaching Muskegon.
The offices of the Canal Company were located on the second floor of the two-and-a-half story hotel in Gibraltar. Two leaders associated with this enterprise were Lewis Cass, former Governor, and Daniel Webster, a renowned orator and national political figure of that time.
Lewis Cass, who lived in Detroit, and Daniel Webster were invited to Gibraltar to discuss the details and deliver speeches from the hotel explaining the great benefits this canal would bring to Michigan. Webster announced he would personally acquire $20,000 of Canal Company stock.
The Gibralter-Flat Rock Land and Canal Company actually filled the area with a number of its settlers. It was widely advertised and created a great confidence with the pioneers that lots were sold for $5,000 or more.
Dredging did begin along the Huron River, however the project failed in 1838.

Gibraltar, was platted and recorded on March 14, 1837, by Peter Godfroy, Benjamin B. Kerchival, and Joshua Howard, all Trustees of the Land and Canal Company.
Amos Dunbar became the first Postmaster on October 2, 1837. The post office was renamed, Woodbury on December 8, 1838, but was named back to Gibraltar by May 13, 1839.

Many of the early settlers arrived here by boat. Many came from the east coast by way of the Erie Canal and across Lake Erie. It was the safer method of travel, because of the undeveloped territory in between. Some settlers originally came from Europe on sailing vessels, taking on average six weeks to cross the ocean.

As with most of the communities in the area, farming, lumber, and shipbuilding became important economic products. Scottish shipwrights, French woodsmen, and Irish laborers poured into Gibraltar to build schooners. The men in the woods, cut the lumber needed for the sawmill. Most of the houses took in sailors and workers as boarders, and the two-and-a-half-story hotel was always full. The lumber provided planks for the ships and material for the basket shop. A coopersmith shop was also in operation. Sand and cement for the shipyards were brought in by water.
One of the shipyards was owned by R. Linn, who was born in Scotland. He came to Gibtraltar in 1841, where he became a shipbuilder. He was joined in business in 1866 by Captain J. Craig, who was from New York. They became pioneers in building merchant vessels in the area.
Other shipbuilding names during this period, from about 1860 through 1894 were, Alford, Calkins, Clark, and Morgan. The shipyards stretched from Grandview north on the riverfront. Records indicate at least 23 vessels were built in Gibtraltar from 1863 to 1882. They included 11 propeller, 6 barges, and 6 schooners.
The population of Gibraltar in 1873 was approximately 400 people.
Local Business Directory Lists:
Herman Alford - General Store & Shipbuilder
John Brown - Blacksmith
Doremus & itcheell - Cigar Manufacturers
Linn & Craig - Sawmill & Shipbuilders
E. Seaton - Steamboat Captain
William Stoddard - Collector of Customs
E. Sullivan - Hotel Proprietor
W. Thompson - Stove Manufacturer
M. Vreeland - Lighthouse Keeper

At one time, a small steamboat running between Detroit and Cleveland would occasionally stop at Gibraltar. By the 1860s regular service had been established. A vessel named, Olive Branch came through the West Trenton Channel on her round trip from Gibraltar to Detroit, stopping at Trenton and Wyandotte. Other ships providing local service to Gibraltar were The Princess, Island Queen, Newsboy and Massasauga.
The Massasauga met with disaster in August of 1890, when a fire broke out on the steamer, and by the time it was discovered, it was impossible to save it from ruin.

Hector Munro, originally from Scotland, first stopped in Sandusky and Toledo, Ohio before coming to Gibraltar in 1879. He had originally been a ship builder as well, but when he came to Gibraltar he operated his own schooner, hauling freight on the Great Lakes. While living in Sandusky, he sailed to Canada to pick up his wife and sons, who had arrived from Scotland. His oldest son, Daniel soon had his own schooner, the Oak Leaf.
The Oak Leaf was built by the Munros in 1895. It was 86 feet long, 24 feet wide, and weighed 93 gross tons. She, along with the schooner, Charles Chamber, which was built in Grosse Isle, were the last trading schooners built on the Detroit River.

As mentioned earlier, there were about 30 steamboats cruising the Great Lakes by 1837. The importance of the aid to navigation was becoming more critical as lake travel increased. The U.S. Congress appropriated $5,000 on March 3, 1837, to build a lighthouse at the mouth of the Detroit River in Gibraltar. A lighthouse inspector's report taken in 1838, states in part:
"Gibralter Lighthouse, at the mouth of the Detroit River, on the western channel: This is lighted with eleven lamps and an equal number of relectors, fixed. It is a new building, and in excellent order. I am inclined to believe,..that the keeper is doing his utmost, and will, upon his recover, give perfect satisfaction."
There is no mention of the lighthouse keeper by name, nor what he may have been taken ill with.

In 1868, Coast Guard records show extensive repairs needed at the original Gibraltar Lighthouse. In 1869, it was reported that the dwelling and tower were in very bad condition and a new building was necessary. In 1871, an appropriation of $10,000 was recommended, and on June 10, 1872, it was approved. The new building occupied the land of the previous lighthouse and was completed February 1, 1873. The lighthouse was discontinued in 1879. In 1895, the buildings and grounds were sold at public auction and the lantern and iron stairway of the tower were removed.

Everyday Life in Gibraltar


People obtained their cooking and drinking water from the River, walking out onto small docks and dipping usually two pails at a time. During the winter, ice was cut from the river and stored in icehouses, for use later in the year. After being cut from the river, the blocks would be hauled up a ramp, loaded on a stone-type wagon, and hauled to icehouses. There it was heavily insulated with sawdust to insure it would last until the next winter season. It was usually cut into 2 foot-square blocks and sold for about 1.5 cents per block.
The area newspaper was called the Wayne County Courier and in an article dated January 22, 1885, it made mention "R.W. Linn's shipyard being put in order for work.... A mill will again start up after the weather moderates.... The new barge building will employ quite a large force of men.
Claston and Parsons have opened a stone quarry near the Gibraltar Station, expecting to do quite a large business in stone trade. The railroad company is putting in side tracks for them.
Edmund Hall intends making improvements on this river-front during early spring. He is having a pile driver built for the purpose of sheet piling, and dredging.
Captain H. Alford, the shipbuilder, has contracted to build a scow for Detroit parties."

The 1900's


One particular farm, has an important nautical history to Gibraltar, located at the south end of today's, Lowell Street at Grandview. The Edmund Hall farm had a large frame house, a boat house on the water, and was seperated from Horse Island by a dredged channel on the east side of the property. The farm had pastures and lanes running through it, where cattle grazed, with barns near the area of Stoeflet and Adams Streets. Edmund Hall gave many local residents jobs, at $1 per day. He also had a blacksmith shop, a carpenter shop, carriage house, icehouse, and a granary.
During this time, the area of Gibraltar was largely a swampy area, with a musch decreased population of approximately 100 inhabitants.
In the early 1920's, Horse Island, which had formerly been owned by Edmund Hall's daughter, Frances Chaney Strong, was platted and lots were sold for building sites, used primarily for summer cottages. The remainder of Hall's land was plated into lots in 1925, and sold. Another part of Hall's original land claim, included Edmund Island (formerly known as Big Snake Island). The first private home was built here in 1929 by a dentist, Dr. Vasik.
The Horse Island Boat Basin was one of the early boatyards in the area, and was started in the early 1920's by Otto O. Rieger, when he constructed a home, store, and docks on the north end of Horse Island. It was later sold to the Tenant family in 1958, then to the City of Gibraltar in 1993. The city tore down the original buildings and docks to make room for a replacement Horse Island Bridge, however, the bridge which had originally been built in the early 1920's was declared a historic site, and uneligible for destruction. This meant a new bridge would have to be built next to the old one, if it were actually declared unsafe. In 1996, the original bridge was declared safe and therefore, it never had to be replaced.

The Chalk Boat Works was open on North Gibraltar Road in 1939, where E. Chalk had boat wells, repair facilities, and storage. It is no longer there, however. By 1946, the Gibraltar Boat Yard began is business run by Fred Blakely and Hazen Munro. It originally consisted of about 20 boats wells, and later added gas pumps and marine accessories and parts. It was later sold to Jack Bulh in 1968.
Heinrich Marine (currenly Humbug Marina) was opened in 1954 by E.W. Heinrich. He purchased the property on Middle Gibraltar Road from William Lawson, when it was only a large swamp area. After a couple years of dredging, there was room for about 100 boat wells. It was sold in 1964 to Evertte Hedke and renamed, Humbug Marina.

It wasn't until 1954, that Gibraltar became incorporated as a village. They had their own police patrol by 1956, and by 1961, had a population of 2,187. It became the "second smallest" city in Michigan.

The residents of Gibraltar and its neighboring Cherry Island have lived through many floods over the years. The most remembered occurred in 1952, 1972-73, and 1985. The Army Corps of Enginners had built stone dikes along the water's edge throughout Gibraltar, in 1973, as a result of the floods in late 1972. These dikes are several feet high and limited the water view from most of the houses. These dikes remained here until the wood framework rotted and they began to fall, or the property owners tore them down, preferring a nice view of the water, to a potential flood. The floods in early 1985, convinced most of them to construct clay dikes along their property, whic were constructed by the city in 1986.
 
Contributed by Linda Ball

Greenfield is a former civil township of Wayne County, Michigan; it was created from a portion of neighboring Springwells Township in 1833. Greenfield eventually encompassed the survey township T1S R11E. By 1875, a series of annexations to Detroit and Highland Park had begun; by 1926, the township of Greenfield had ceased to exist.

Founding and early times

Grosse Ile historians consider the beginning of ownership and governance of the community by residents of European heritage to have begun on July 6, 1776, when the Potawatomi Indians deeded the island to prominent Detroit merchants, brothers William and Alexander Macomb. Although the Potawatomi Indians, like most Native Americans, did not believe in the European legal concept of land ownership, they did consider the island to be part of their ancestral lands. The Potawatomi Indians called the island Kitcheminishen.

Historians assume that the Macomb brothers believed that by purchasing this deed through the transfer of items of value, they had in fact obtained full ownership rights. In any case, the Macomb brothers are considered to be the founders, and first legal owners, of Grosse Ile, because the Potawatomis, and later the United States government, respected the Macombs' perceived rights to take possession of the island.

Today, recognition of the Macomb brothers' historical importance is found in numerous places in the community. The central business district of Grosse Ile is located along Macomb Street which was named in their honor. A monument commemorating the day that the tribal chiefs and elders signed the deed to the Macomb brothers is located near the shoreline of the Detroit River at the foot of Gray's Drive. The original deed, which was written on parchment, is currently stored in the Burton Historical Collection within the Detroit Public Library.

There are at least two homes still standing on the island that were built during the 19th century by a descendant or relative of the Macomb brothers. The Rucker-Stanton House on West River Road was built in 1848 by the great-grandson of William Macomb. The Wendell House on East River Road was built in the late 1860s by the John Wendell whom married the granddaughter of William Macomb.

Westcroft Gardens, a Michigan Centennial Farm located on West River Road, is operated to this day by descendants of the Macombs. Westcroft, which is open to the public, features a nursery well known for growing and selling hybrid azaleas and rhododendrons. During the Halloween season they have haunted hay rides in the back of the farm called "Phantom Forest." In the winter and around the Christmas season they have Christmas hayrides which take you through the woods full of lights. Westcroft is one of the oldest farms in Michigan still owned by the same family. Most of the original buildings at Westcroft Gardens are still standing to this day and well preserved.

The flags of three nations—France, England, and the United States—have flown over Grosse Ile since the first Europeans, French explorers, visited the island during the late 17th century. The early French explorers named the island as la grosse ile—the "big island" in French. The British, whose control of Michigan was established in 1763 after their victory in the French and Indian War, anglicized the spelling to "Grosse Isle". This form was commonly used until early during the 20th century when local residents succeeded in an effort to re-establish the French version as the official name of the community. To the dismay of historic preservationists and long-time residents, it is still common for the uninformed to mispronounce the name of the community.

Catholic priest and missionary Father Louis Hennepin accompanied fellow French explorer René-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle on the ship Le Griffon in exploring the Great Lakes in 1679. The Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church on Grosse Ile maintains that Father Hennepin came ashore and said mass at a location on the east shore of the island near the present site of St. Anne's Chapel. While there apparently is not written proof of this specific event, Father Hennepin did write in his journals about the fruit orchards and wild animals on Grosse Ile, so historians assume that, at the very least, he explored the island first-hand. The north end of Grosse Ile is named Hennepin Point in his honor.

Grosse Ile played a minor role in the founding of the city of Detroit by the French explorer Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac. Cadillac and his convoy of 25 canoes sailed down the Detroit River and camped on the shore of Grosse Ile during the evening of July 23, 1701. On the morning of July 24, Cadillac returned upriver and reached a spot on the shore near the present intersection of West Jefferson and Shelby streets in Detroit, where he claimed French possession of the territory under the authority of King Louis XIV.

Although Grosse Ile maintained its own name and identity as a community beginning in the 18th century, it did not obtain status as an independent unit of government until October 27, 1914, when the Wayne County Board of Supervisors agreed to separate the island from Monguagon Township. The first supervisor of Grosse Ile Township was Leonard H. Wilton.

SOURCE:  Wikipedia

Grosse Pointe was incorporated as a village in 1880, but at that time also included what is now Grosse Pointe Farms. The community was divided along its present lines in 1893 over issues of allowing the sale of alcohol. It was incorporated as a city in 1934.

SOURCE:  Wikipedia

Hamtramck is a city in Wayne County of the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 22,423. Hamtramck is surrounded by the city of Detroit except for a small portion of the western border that touches the similarly surrounded city of Highland Park. Hamtramck is named for the French-Canadian soldier Jean François Hamtramck who was the first American commander of Fort Shelby, the fortification at Detroit.

Hamtramck was originally settled by German farmers, but Polish immigrants flooded into the area when the Dodge Brothers plant opened in 1914. Poles used to make up a large proportion of the population. It is sometimes confused with Poletown, a traditional Polish neighborhood, which used to lie mostly in the city of Detroit and includes a small part of Hamtramck. As of the 2010 American Community Survey, 14.5% of Hamtramck's population is of Polish origin; in 1970, it was 90% Polish.

By the mid-1920s 78% of the residents of Hamtramck owned their own houses or were buying their houses. Around that time, the factory workers made up 85% of Hamtramck's heads of households. Of those factory workers, half were not skilled.

SOURCE:  Wikipedia

 

Huron Township was organized in 1827 and originally included the land that now contains the cities of Romulus and Belleville as well as the townships of Van Buren and Sumpter. In the 1830s, a settlement was platted on the banks of the Huron River. The first post office opened with the name Huron, but soon closed. In 1860 a new post office was opened with the name Catville but changed its name to New Boston by 1868. Other early settlements included Belden, platted in 1857 by Frances J. Belden and now known as Willow, and Waltz, platted in 1872 by Joseph Waltz.

On March 17, 1835 the northeastern portion of Huron Township was set off and organized as Romulus Township. Within a few weeks, on April 6, 1835, the northwestern portion of the township became Van Buren Township. On April 6, 1840 the western half of the remaining portion of Huron Township organized as the township of Sumpter, creating the current boundaries of township.

SOURCE:  Wikipedia

The area was originally inhabited by Native Americans, but was settled by non-indigenous people in 1825. A post office named "Moulin Rouge" was established there in December 1857. Robert Inkster, a Scotsman born March 27, 1828, in Lerwick, Shetland, operated a steam sawmill on present-day Inkster Road near Michigan Avenue in the early 1860s.

The post office was renamed Inkster in July 1863. The village had a station on the Michigan Central Railroad by 1878. It incorporated as a village in 1926 from parts of Nankin Township and Dearborn Township. After much legal wrangling by the city of Dearborn, Dearborn Township, and the village of Inkster to sort out final borders for these communities, Inkster was incorporated as a city in 1964.

Around the 1920s and 1930s black people working in Henry Ford's factories settled in Inkster because they did not want to commute from Detroit and they were not allowed to live in Dearborn.

SOURCE: Wikipedia

First settled by pioneers from New England and New York, an act by the Legislature of the Territory of Michigan established the borders of Livonia Township on March 17, 1835. The settlers brought with them the name "Livonia", a name that had already been given to Livonia, New York, Livonia, Pennsylvania and a region of the Baltic Sea named Livonia in present day Estonia and Latvia, from which many early settlers came.

During the days it was a township there were many small communities in Livonia. One of these was Elmwood initially known as McKinley's Station. It was a stop on the Detroit, Lansing and Northern Railroad. It had a post office from 1858 until 1906. There was a post office in the township named Giltedge from 1899 until 1902.[10]

Livonia was incorporated into a city on May 23, 1950, by vote of the citizens of the township. A significant motivation was to gain tax revenues from the DRC (Detroit Race Course), which was Michigan's only thoroughbred horse racetrack that closed in 1998.

SOURCE: Wikipedia

Nankin Township, Michigan, is a former township of Wayne County in the U.S. state of Michigan.

Three Algonquin tribes - Potawatomi, Ojibwa, and Ottawa - met each year on the middle fork of the Rouge River at the site of Nankin Mills to establish hunting territories. "Bucklin Township" was first organized in 1827, named in honor of Joseph Bucklin, who in 1772 fired a musket and severely wounded British Royal Navy captain in the first intentional and planned attack on English military forces in the American Revolution. Bucklin Township included what are now the cities of Westland, Livonia, Garden City, Inkster, Wayne, Dearborn, Dearborn Heights and Redford Township. In 1829, it was proposed that Bucklin Township be divided into Lima and Richland. Due to name conflicts under territorial law prohibiting duplication of post office names, the bill was amended; Lima was renamed Nankin Township, after the Chinese city Nanking, and Richland was renamed Pekin Township, after Peking.

In 1833 Pekin was renamed Redford Township, and its southern portion was subsequently set off as Dearborn Township. In 1834 Plymouth Township's southern portion became Canton Township, named after Canton, Imperial China.

In 1835, Livonia Township (now the city of Livonia) was split off from Nankin. There was a post office called East Nankin beginning in 1857.

Garden City, Inkster, and Wayne then incorporated from land either partially or wholly within Nankin Township. The remainder of the township incorporated as the city of Westland, effective May 16, 1966. The city took its name from a mall and was the fourth largest city in Wayne County when it incorporated.

Source:  Wikipedia

While the village of Northville developed within the borders of Plymouth Township from the 1820s, Northville Township itself did not exist until 1898. At that time, local residents, allegedly feeling slighted by Plymouth Township officials being more focused on Plymouth Village, decided to split off into a separate township. In this way, the former Plymouth "SuperTownship" (which formerly included all of Canton, Plymouth, and Northville Townships) became split into Plymouth Township and Northville Township.

SOURCE:  Wikipedia

Springwells Township and Bucklin Township were formally organized and laid out by gubernatorial act on April 12, 1827. Due to postal regulations prohibiting two post offices having the same name, when a township was subdivided unique names had to be found. The Bucklin name was extinguished when it was split on October 29, 1829, along what is today Inkster Road into Nankin Township (west half) and Pekin Township (east half), named as a result of a wave of interest in China. In March of 1833 Pekin was renamed Redford and the southern half became Dearborn Township on April 1. The name Redford was chosen because Indians and pioneers forded the River Rouge where the river runs through Redford. The word 'rouge' is French for the color red.

The township used to go all the way to Greenfield Road, but in the 1920s the eastern portions of the township were annexed by Detroit. This annexation ceased in 1926 when the township was given "charter" status by the Michigan legislature. In 1918 there was a post office named "Five Points" operating between 6 Mile Road and 7 Mile Road along the road of that name.

SOURCE:  Wikipedia

Taylor is a city in Wayne County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 63,131 at the 2010 census. Taylor was originally known as Taylor Township and residents of the township voted to incorporate as the City of Taylor in May 1968. Taylor is the 17th most populous city in Michigan and the 543rd largest city in the United States.

Taylor Township was named in honor of Zachary Taylor, a national military hero in the 1840s, who would go on to be elected the twelfth President of the United States in 1849. Taylor Township was organized on March 16, 1847 from 24 square miles that were originally part of Ecorse Township, Michigan. It is also 18 miles southwest of Detroit.

SOURCE:  Wikipedia

During the 18th century, the area was inhabited by the people of a Potawatomi Indian village. Other tribes, particularly three Algonquian tribes, used the area as hunting territory.

Before becoming Westland, the area had several other names. Though white settlers did not begin to settle the area until about 1824, they began passing through at the beginning of the 19th century.

Bucklin Township was first organized in 1827 and included what is now the cities of Westland, Livonia, Garden City, Inkster, Wayne, Dearborn, Dearborn Heights and Redford Township.

By an act of the Michigan Territorial Legislature, October 20, 1829, Bucklin was divided into Lima and Richland townships. However, due to a naming conflict under postal regulations at that time, Lima was renamed Nankin Township, after the Chinese city Nanking, and Richland as Pekin Township, named after Peking, though Pekin became Redford Township in 1833.

In 1835, Livonia Township was split off from Nankin. Wayne incorporated as a village in 1869 and as a city in 1960. Garden City incorporated as a village in 1927 and as a city in 1933. Inkster incorporated as a village in 1926 and as a city in 1964.

Nankin Mills (located at 33175 Ann Arbor Trail) was built in 1842 as a gristmill and used by area farmers who once farmed this area. In 1916, Henry Ford purchased the mill and restored it as part of his Village Industries project devised as a way to allow farmers to work in the growing auto industry without having to move off their farms. Once restored, the mill was used to make stencils for Ford Motor Company. The automaker eventually sold the mill to Wayne County, and the historic building is now home to Wayne County Parks, which houses an interpretive center with exhibits on the natural and cultural history of the area and also hosts community events.

Eloise in the far southeast of the city began when the County Home for the poor was relocated here in 1839 from Gratiot Avenue. It later evolved into a sanitorium largely for treating tuberculosis and then was made Wayne County General Hospital in 1945. It had a post office named Eloise starting in 1894.


SOURCE:  Wikipedia

Under a special Act of Legislaters, promoters of Charitable Insitiutions engaged in a movement to become incorporated in 1837 as The Ladies' Protestant Orphan Asylum.
The directors were Mrs. Charles C. Trowbridge, Mrs. Robert Stuart and Mrs. Thomas Palmer, and the Asylum was opened in a building donated, rent free, by Cullen Brown, on Beaubein Street, south of Fort Street.
The Institution, although has relocated several times, has remained in operation, with the exception of a 6 year interval, for over 125 years. It's incorporation under the name of The Protestant Orphan Asylum dates from June 8, 1889. At that time, it's location was at 988 Jefferson Avenue.

St Vincent's Catholic Orphan Asylum was later opened by the Catholic Female Association, who had organized in 1834, for the relief of the sick and poor of Detroit. It's organization almost coincided with the Cholera Epidemic that broke out in the city. The parish priest, Father Kundig, took care of 30 children, who's parents have fallen victim to the disease.
In the Spring of 1836, Father Kundig, leased 26 acres of land adjoining the County Farm, which was located on the North side of Gratiot West of Mt Elliott Avenue, and erected a building there. The children were cared for largely by the Female Association, and Father Kundig.
During the Panic of 1837, followed by a depression, Father Kundig went bankrupt and some of his creditors seized the clothing belonging to the 30 children in the asylum.
In 1839, the asylum was closed and the children were distributed to farmers or family acquaintances.
A similar work was revived in 1851, by the Sister's of Charity, who opened a house under the name, St Vincent's Female Orphan Asylum, in an old building on the Southside of Larned near Randolph Street. After 2 moves, they established in a brick building on Randolph, between Congress and Larned Streets. (previously the Bishop's residence) The capacity was 150 and it stayed open until 1876. In July of that year, they moved to a spacious 252 x 260 foot lot on McDougall Avenue between Larned and Congress, with accomodations for 250 females.
The Sister of Charity also open the House of Providence in 1869, for destitute children and unfortuneate women. It was located on 14th Street between Dazelle and Marantette. It was incorporated in 1874.

On June 2, 1857, a meeting of 60 ladies from the First Congregational Church was held to consider establishing an organization to help the hungry children of the city, who went begging door to door. They established The Industrial School, which for half a century was one of the most popular and useful local institutions in the City. It was opened October 5, 1857, in an upstairs room at 26 Monroe Avenue with 16 students. In May of 1858, it moved to the Northwest corner of Washington and Grand River, into a 2-story building. By 1866, there were able to purchase the property and in 1879, were able to completely replace the building with a new 3-story structure. The school was open to girls under age 14 years and to boys under age 10 years. They were taught useful occupations and given an education.

St Anthony's Male Orphan Asylum, one of the more prominent of the early institutions, was open May 26, 1867. It was located on Gratiot Avenune on the Malcher Farm. This was a Catholic Institution, originally managed by trustees, but in 1877, managed by the Franciscan Order.

St Luke's Hospital and Church Home was open by St Paul's Protestant Epsicopal Church in 1861. They were located on Lafayette in 1864, on West 4th Street in 1868, and later on Highland Avenue.

The Boy's Home and D'Arcambal Association was another charitable organization. It was developed from the D'Arcambal Home of Industry for discharged prisoners, founded by Mrs. Agnes D'Arcambal in 1890. After her death, the association was incorporated and began the work of caring for young boys. The boys were housed at first in the Old Biddle House, on Jefferson Avenue, and later moved to Lafayette Street near Third. In 1907, the institution was moved to farmland in Farmington Township.

St Joseph's Retreat, once known as Michigan Retreat for the Insane, located in Dearborn, began in 1860, when Sister Mary DeSales established a home for the insane on Michigan Avenue just west of 24th Street. The grounds were originally used for farming and for convalescents of St Mary's Hospital. In 1870, a brick building was erected, and the institution was incorporated in December of that same year, and later incorporated again, under it's new name in November of 1883. The decision to move to Dearborn was made in 1885, and they opened at their new location October 28, 1886.

By Legislative Act of June 23, 1828, the people of the City of Detroit, were authorized to vote on the question of the Wayne County Poor House. They voted against erecting a new building for this project, however by Acts of June 22, 1830 and March 3, 1831, the Board of Supervisors were empowered to purchase 160 acres of land for a poor farm, and erect a suitable building.
On March 8, 1832, Supervisors appointed a committee to seek a suitable site with expenses of $1,200. The Committee purchased 17 acres from John L. Leib in Hamtramck on March 27, 1832. The site is now the Northwest corner of Gratiot and Mt Elliot Avenues.
Charles Moran and Edmund Brush contracted David French on October 4, 1832 to build a Poor House building. The building itself was 66 feet x 22 feet and 2-stories. The first keeper was J.P. Cooley, who managed for only a year and a half, under the direction of the Board of Supervisors. In 1834, the Board of Superintendents of the Poor, was created, and Rev Martin Kundig was appointed Superintendent.
The Sister's of St Clare were placed in direct charge of the institution until the inmates moved to the 2nd Poorhouse, in 1839.
During Kundig's administration a second epidemic of cholera broke out in Detroit and the Poorhouse was soon filled with children who's parents died by the plague. To relieve the conditions Kundig purchased a site adjoining the County property and erected a free orphan's home.
After Kundig lost everything of value he owned, he still remained Superintendent until April 10, 1839, when the location of the Poorhouse was moved to Nankin Township.
The new location in Nankin was in the middle of a forest and was only a log house formerly known as the Black House Tavern. One rough road led to the house. The Board erected a 2-story frame building East of the log tavern.
In February 1845, a brick building was approved to replace the log house. The new building was 85 feet long by 36 feet wide and 2 and half stories high. One large fireplace heated the entire building. Two cells were constructed for "the unruly" and "crazy". Chains were fastened to the walls to help restrain any violent inmates.
In 1856, the frame building was moved East of the brick building and an extension of 40 feet was added to the brick building. In 1859 a 70 foot by 34 foot wing extending North from the main building was authorized and constructed. Additions and improvements were made until February of 1896.
The entire area was then known as Eloise, which designated the entire group of the Wayne County Poorhouse, the Infirmary, and the Hospital. Later consisting of only Eloise Infirmary, Eloise Sanitorium, and Eloise Hospital.
The Infirmary was the development of the Wayne County Poor House, called Wayne County Almshouse in 1872 and later The Wayne County House in 1886.
On June 2, 1913, it became the Eloise Infirmary. By 1914, the women's annex to the infirmary was added.
The Eloise Sanatorium was a new hospital for the treatment of tuberculosis, by the outdoor method, which opened in 1903, with 2 tents outside, with brick foundations. The first building for indoor treatment was completed in May of 1911 and opened for patients June 6, 1911.
The name Eloise Hospital was adopted August 18, 1911, for the group of buildings devoted to the care of mentally diseased patients, formerly known as the Wayne County Asylum.
Bridget Hughes was the first person admitted as "insane" and she remained an inmate for 53 years.
The first large building was a 2 and half story brick building, consisting of a center structure and 2 wings, one on each side. This was completed in 1869, and the "insane" were housed in the center. The wings were added in 1876. The center eventually was reconstructed in 1899, and another wing was added in 1904 and in 1905.
Building C was first called Women's New Building and erected in 1894. Building D, originally called Women's Insane Hospital, was constructed in 1904. A post office was also established in 1894, named Eloise. (daughter of Freeman B. Dickerson, then President of the Board)


The earliest Hospital in the City to have a continuous existence, was St Mary's, which opened June 9, 1845. On November 6, 1850 the location was Clinton Street near St Antoine.

Prior to 1866, there was a Soldier's Home located in the Arsenal Building, at the corner of Jefferson Avenue and Main Street, it was relocated in 1866 to Harper Hospital.

One of the last (of the Early) Public Institutions to open was the Merill-Palmer Motherhood & Home Training School in 1918. It was a training school for girls 10 years old and up, to prepare them for wifehood and motherhood.

Year Enumeration Institution Year Enumeration Institution
1850 27th District Lyons Hotel 1860 Nankin Township Wayne County Poor House
1850 27th District Hillardow Boarding House 1860 Ward 1 The Michigan Exchange
1850 27th District Borriman Boarding House 1860 Ward 1 Baggs Hotel
1850 27th District Hardt Boarding House 1860 Ward 1 Garrison House
1850 27th District Barston Hotel 1860 Ward 3 Detroit Concert Hall
1850 27th District Purdy Hotel 1860 Ward 3 Biddle House
1850 27th District Soldier's Home 1860 Ward 10 US Marine Hospital
1850 29th District 1850 Wayne County Jail 1860 Ward 10 Protestant Orphan Asylum
1850 27th District 1850 Rail Road Hotel 1850 27th District Gilgan Boarding House & Moore Hotel
1850 29th District Haulg Boarding Home 1860 27th District US Arsenal - Dearborn
1860 Ward 2 Merchants Exchange 1860 Ward 2 Blindbury Hotel

 

Some 1880 Public Residencies & Asylums in Detroit
Enumeration District Ward Institution Name
269 Ward 1 Knight Boarding House
270 Ward 1 Central Hotel
272 Ward 2 McCreery Hotel
273 Ward Sacred Heart Orphan Asylum
275 Ward 1 St Mary's Hospital


1900 Eloise & Detroit

Enumeration District Name of Institution Enumeration District Name of Institution
Nankin Township Eloise Hospital & Infirmary Nankin Township Wayne County Poor House
District 2/Ward 1-Detroit Russell House District 2/Ward 1-Detroit St Clair Hotel
District 1/Ward 1-Detroit Atwater Hotel District 3/Ward 1-Detroit Farras Street Hotel
District 5/Ward 1-Detroit The Lewis Home Metric Institution & School District 1/ Ward 1 Grandall Hotel
Dearborn - Enumeration 180 St Joseph's Retreat



Institutions of Detroit in 1920

Enumeration District Name of Institution Enumeration District Name of Institution
13 McGregory Institute 22 Jewish Old People's Home
28 Grace & Harper Hospital 29 King's Hospital for the Insane
29 Women's Detention Center 30 Women's Hospital & Infant's Home
51 Van Leaven Brown Hospital and School 60 Sister's of Charity
62 Frances E. Wellard Home 75 Home for Old Ladies Heacombs Home
79 Thompsons Home for Old Ladies 80 St Joseph's Home for Boys - 1920 Census
91 Wayne County Jail 93 Phyllis Wheatley Home
93 Florence Crittendon Home 104 Children's Free Hospital
115 Monastery of Blessed Sacrament 162 Helping Hands Home
170 Juvenile Detention Home - 1920 Census 182 Salvation Army Industrial Home
193 Wesley Institute 212 City Municipal Hospital
219 City Tuberculosis Sanitorium 225 German Hungarian Arbieter Home
227 Home For The Aged 242 Sister's of F.H.M.
268 Providence Nursing Home 284 Sister's of Felician Home for Orphans
293 Arnold Home for Aged & Incurable 295 House of the Good Shepherd
296 St. Unreadable Convent & Sister's of Holy 298 St Vincent's Convent
311 Sister's of Charity 319 Providence Hospital & House of Providence
328 St Vincent's Orphan Asylum 342 Russian National Home
344 Samaritan Hospital 347 Salvation Army Rescue Home & Hospital
356 Felician Sister's Convent & Orphanage 379 St Frances Home for Orphan Boys
380 Protestant Wayne Co Orphan Asylum 404 St John's Catholic School
410 West Side Sanitarium 433 German Protestant Home for Orphans & Old People
478 Mute & Deaf Institute 488 St Luke's Hospital & Home
493 Holy Redeemer & Catholic Home 500 Unreadable Father's Institute
557 House of Corrections 558 Industrial Hospital
581 Sister's Catholic Convent & School 585 Pennsylvania Avenue Sanitarium
608 Sister's of Felician Order


1930 Detroit Asylums & Institutions & Eloise
Enumeration District Name of Institution Enumeration District Name of Institution
District 3-Detroit McGregory Institute District 17-Detroit Grace Hospital-Helen Newberry Nurses Home
District 66 Wayne County Jail District 85 Monastery of Blessed Sacrament
District 167 Sacred Heart Convent District 169 Tuberculosis Sanitarium
District 182 Detroit House of Corrections District 230 Pasadena Hotel
District 244 Felician Sisters Convent Orphan Asylum District 245 Felician Sisters Mother House & Novitiate
District 246 Felician Sisters Convent District 254 Sisters of St Stanislaus Parish
District 283 House of the Good Shepherd District 297 Sisters of Charity St Leo's
District 305 House of Providence District 318 St Vincent's Home & School
District 365 St Francis Home for Orphan Boys District 371 Protestant Orphan Asylum
District 372 U.S. Marine Hospital District 384 Sisters of Christian Charity Convent
District 430 German Protestant Home for Orphans & Old People District 453 St Bonaventures Monastery
District 488 Most Holy Redeemer Convent District 503 St Francis Convent
District 599 Fort Wayne See Photo of Fort Wayne Ruines & Map District 1027 - Eloise Wayne County Home & Insane Asylum (Eloise)

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